Monthly Archives: July 2020

Virtual Job Search: 3 Tips for Job Seekers

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, CV writing, Job interviews, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

In just a few short months so much has changed in the world, let alone in the UK. Industries, schools, homes, and healthcare were thrown into disarray as the pandemic took hold and spread from country to country.

Now, finally, there is light on the horizon. Hiring freezes are easing gradually as the lockdown eases and the country navigates its way into a social-distance compliant future. For job seekers, the major changes will be in the job search and job logistics. It is less likely that a job candidate will meet with a recruiter or hiring manager in person and more likely to be a virtual job search experience. Likewise, many employers are strengthening their remote workforces and hiring on a work-from-home (WFH) and work-from-anywhere (WFA) basis.

When you are looking for your new job opportunity you might find that you are invited to interviews via Zoom or a similar video conferencing software app. To get the best from a virtual job search take a look at our tips below.

Virtual Job Search Video interview

Photo by Allie on Unsplash.

The New Virtual Job Search

There is increased competition for jobs compared to the start of the year. To stand out, make sure your CV is up to date, that your most relevant experience shines through. CVs should be easy to read, fuss-free, and each job listed should include the relevant tasks that suit the job you are applying for.

Job advertising will remain online with job sites picking up more and more new jobs over the coming weeks and months. Stay ahead of the competitors by signing up to job alerts for the roles that interest you most. That way you will have them delivered straight to your inbox.

Be ready to apply quickly for new jobs as some employers start the interview process as applications come in. Getting your application in first could see you getting in front of the hiring manager sooner than others,” says Ken Little, a career writer at Australia2Write and Write My X.

Practice Your Virtual Interview Skills

You may have been on video call during lockdown for work and fun, and would be forgiven for thinking a virtual interview would be similar. Though the technology is the same, a virtual interview will be much more formal than even the work calls you have had. When you are invited to a video interview make sure you have the all right details. You should know who you are meeting, when the interview is, and what technology is being used. Don’t assume anything, ask for details if they are not given up front.

Practising your interview skills beforehand is a must for any job process. With virtual interviews, it is more important than ever. Rope in a friend or two to play the role of interviewer and set up a mock interview video call. Mock interviews are a great way for you to build confidence and spot any nervous tics you need to manage.

Whatever the job, always dress appropriately and preferably professionally for your interview no matter where or how it takes place.

On the day of your interview, find a quiet spot in your home where you won’t be distracted or disturbed. Clear any clutter from around so there are no distractions that might catch the hiring managers eye. “Switch on your camera before you interview so you can see in advance if the space around you is clear and close the door so no pets or kids come in,” says Hugo Davy, an editor at Britstudent and Nextcoursework.

Keep An Open Mind

It goes without saying that some industries and professions have been hit harder by Covid-19. These will be slower to restart the hiring process as they try to rebuild. This means that for many people the next job move may require them to adapt or pivot in their careers or take the advice of Sheryl Sandberg and move sideways when you can’t move up. This can be daunting but can also lead to great opportunities that you maybe hadn’t considered previously.

Adapting does not have to mean changing industry or profession completely but can also mean using your skills and experience in a new way. Keep an open mind when seeking a job and be aware of all your abilities, not just those you have used in your most recent employment.

Author: Michael Dehoyos
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Michael is a job editor at PhD Kingdom and Assignment Writing Service. He assists companies in their hiring strategy concepts, and contributes to numerous sites and publications. Also, he is a writer at Origin Writings.

CV Writing Tips for Landing Your Dream Internship

This entry was posted in Careers advice, CV writing, Uncategorized and tagged , , on by Andres Herrera.

An internship could be your first step into a dream career. Unfortunately, however, places are often limited to school leavers and graduates all vying for the same positions.

To secure an interview you will need to outdo the competition with a really strong CV. Let’s take a look at some top CV writing tips to help you get that internship.

Writing a CV for an internship position

Photo by KOBU Agency on Unsplash

Before you start

Before you rush off and start writing your CV, you need to do some research. Check the internship’s job description to find out everything you can about the role you are applying for.

You should check:

  1. Which keywords have been used?
  2. Which skills are needed?
  3. What experience do they want?

You will also need to know more about the company and industry in general.

Now you know what the employer is looking for, you should aim to demonstrate why you are the perfect fit by including it in your CV.

Writing your CV

When it comes to writing your CV, keep the recruiter in mind at all times. Thanks to your research, you know exactly what they are looking for — so tell them what they want to hear! Of course, you could always hire a professional CV writing service to do this for you.

Divide your CV into these five sections:

1. Contact details

Contact details are an absolute must on your CV. Include your name, address, telephone number and email so the recruiters can get back to you if (and when) you are successful.

2. Personal statement

Add a personal statement to your CV to briefly tell the employer why you will be perfect for the internship position. Don’t go over the top — a short paragraph detailing who you are, what you can offer and your career aims is enough.

3. Employment history

As someone taking their first steps into the industry, you may not have an extensive and relevant employment history — don’t worry, we’ll discuss that later.

But if you do have the industry-relevant experience, make sure to include it. Add your role, the name of the company, its location, website and the dates you were employed.

Next, detail your responsibilities and successes for each role — again, make sure to highlight any achievements that suit the role you are applying for.

4. Education and qualifications

Add your education plus any academic or professional qualifications you might have. Include the name of the institution, qualification and dates you attended.

If your recent school or university education is relevant to the internship you are applying to you can give your education more prominence, particularly if you are lacking relevant work experience.

5. Other skills

Finally, an ‘other skills’ section is a great place to include extra-curricular activities that are relevant to the internship. If you have done any volunteering that your potential employer will find attractive, then make sure to add it, highlighting the internship-relevant parts.

Overall, you should keep your CV to a maximum of two A4 pages in length.

What to do if you lack experience

The reason you are applying for an internship is probably that you want to gain more industry-relevant work experience. So what should you do to make sure your CV shines if you haven’t already worked in that industry?

  1. Highlight relevant strengths. Just because you may not have had a job in the industry, that doesn’t mean you have no experience at all. Work experience, volunteering, community and academic projects all count. Remember to highlight skills that you know the company is looking for.
  2. Push your best skills. If you are going to include more general skills, make sure you back them up with relevant examples. For example, if a company is looking for someone who is a “team player”, then you might want to highlight a time you worked successfully in a group. Wherever possible, include tangible results such as a percentage increase in sales.
  3. Utilise the layout. You don’t have to stick to the traditional method of laying out a CV in chronological order. Instead, put your most relevant experience at the top to highlight your most applicable skills to the role.
  4. Include a cover letter. Cover letters are a great way to highlight your most relevant skills and how they will benefit the company you want an internship with. Include a cover letter and let the recruiter know why you are the person they are looking for.

Conclusion: CV Writing Tips for Landing Your Dream Internship

Writing a CV for an internship and writing a CV for a job are very similar skills.

You always want to know what the employer is looking for and then demonstrate, with tangible results, why you have those skills.

Similarly, there are things in both you definitely don’t want to include. Typos are a big no-no, as are jargon, buzzwords and lies.

The main difference between the two CVs is that when you apply for an internship you may not yet have the relevant work experience. Instead, highlight other areas of your life that demonstrate why you are going to be an asset to the company during your time there.

Author: Andrew Arkley
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Andrew is the founder of PurpleCV, one of the UK’s leading CV writing providers. He has personally written over 3,000 CVs, has over 15 years’ experience in recruitment at a senior level and has conducted thousands of interviews, so he knows precisely what it takes to land a job!