How to Ask Your Boss About Remote Work After Coronavirus

Remote work used to be like a magical dream come true for a lot of employees before the coronavirus pandemic. Now that many employees have been forced to go through this experience for almost a year, many begin to think about what will happen after the crisis. Has this been a parenthesis in their ordinary working life or could it become a future reality? Whether you’re an essay writer or a graphic designer, working from home is definitely an exciting concept that gives you all the flexibility you need.

Looking to continue remote working from home after Covid-19? This article will explain how to ask your boss for this favor without getting fired.

Why Should You Continue Working From Home?

There are so many reasons to work from home a gazillion of them, in fact. Although you may have drawn your own conclusions based on the current atypical experience, these are some of the basic reasons why almost anyone would want to reply to emails from their couch:

Increased productivity

Every employer definitely wants to see a productive employee in a team. But how can you increase or maintain your productivity? For a lot of people, it’s easier to stay productive when they have a perfect and relaxing work space.

Unfortunately, some modern office spaces don’t exactly give you much to work with when it comes to creating a relaxing work environment. The most you can do is throw in a potted plant and a framed photo for decor.

On the other hand, working from home gives you the perfect atmosphere for work. With just a study table, a little renovation, and the right lighting, you can create an amazing work space that would definitely boost your productivity level.

It’s cheaper

Firstly, for people who have to take two buses just to get to work, opting for remote work jobs is definitely a cheaper option. Secondly, you can also cross “lunch” off your list of daily expenses. Hungry? Grab a sandwich or make a bowl of cereal instead of buying an overpriced burger for lunch. This way, you’d get to spend less and save more.

Increased work-life balance

Here’s the moment of raw truth: do you really have a life outside of work? For a lot of people in their thirties and above, the answer to this question is a hard no. If you work by a 9-5 schedule, you’d find it a tad difficult to party or engage in any social activity outside work hours.

Any spare time you have would most likely be spent catching a break or preparing your outfit for the next day.

However, the flexibility associated with working from home lets you create the perfect work-life balance without getting fizzled out. This way, you won’t have to sacrifice your personal life on the altar of work.

Less stress

Working from home isn’t a leeway to escape work or binge on your favourite Netflix series. However, it’s considerably less stressful than going to a physical office every day.

For starters, you won’t have to spend hours choosing the perfect outfit for work. You can even spend an entire work day wearing only a pair of sweatpants. Similarly, the chances of you having to work extra unpaid hours are lower when you work remotely.

How to Ask Your Boss About Remote Work

So, you’ve figured out how to work remotely and you’re ready to walk down this exciting path. But how do you broach the topic with your boss? Just before you get started, it’s important to note that there’s a huge chance that your proposal would be turned down. However, the following tips would help to ensure that you get a positive response from your employer:

Ensure that your current performance is top-notch

Studies have shown that employers are more inclined to grant favours to top-performing workers. As such, just before you pop the question, it’s important to make sure that your performance in recent times has been top-notch. If your employer isn’t impressed with your performance when you work under their watch, it’s unlikely that working from home will yield better results.

Here are some questions that would help you determine if your performance is good enough to get you remote working hours:

  • How would you rate your past performance reviews?
  • Have you had any queries recently?
  • Has the management complained about a drop in your performance?
  • If yes, how have you been able to rectify the situation?
  • What positive feedback have you received from your employer or clients?

The answers to these questions are a clear indicator of what your employer thinks about your performance. If it is below par, then you may need to postpone the conversation until you improve.

This way, you’d be sure of getting a positive response.

Explore your reasons for wanting to work remotely

Exploring your motivation for wanting to work remotely is essential as it adds substance to your proposal. You may not need to explain the nitty-gritty of it but a solid, basic explanation should cut it.

However, just before you begin to list out your reasons, it’s important to do a little soul-searching first. Why do you really want to work from home?

Is commuting to work too stressful for you? Do you need a quiet and more productive work space? Are you trying to improve your mental health?

Drawing up a list of solid reasons will help to convince your employer. If possible, add data and facts to back up your reason. For instance, if commuting to work is too stressful, track the time it takes you to get to work, as well as the financial implications.

Once you’ve laid out your reasons with relevant data to back them up, you can then go on to explain how working from home would solve these problems.

Create a list of all benefits

Working remotely isn’t just about you. Your employer needs to know how the new arrangement would benefit the company as well. Fortunately, remote work comes with a plethora of benefits that would definitely interest your employer.

To help you plead your case, here are some interesting stats about working from home:

  • According to research, remote work greatly reduces absenteeism as remote workers take fewer sick leaves.
  • Remote workers are generally more productive and engaged.
  • Work from home helps to improve employee retention.
  • A flexible working system helps to improve the physical and mental health of employees.
  • Remote work cuts costs for businesses and companies.
  • Work from home option makes employers and companies more attractive to job seekers.

You could also carry out research for industry-specific stats about remote working. This would give your proposal more credibility and substance.

Create a solid plan

Here’s one thing you should know: your boss would definitely have a lot of questions and rebuttals. As such, it’s important to anticipate possible problems and create a blueprint for tackling them beforehand.

Covering the practicalities is the first step to creating a solid plan for your remote journey. You would need to answer the following questions:

  • What days would you work remotely?
  • How will you define working hours?
  • Where will you work? (would you be working from home, a library or a shared office space?)
  • How will you facilitate your remote working experience?

Once you’ve covered the basics, you can go on to map out a structure to overcome the typical struggles associated with remote work. Here are some areas you should cover:

  • Strategies and tools for communicating with your employer and coworkers
  • How your boss can keep track of your progress
  • The milestones and relevant KPIs to be set

A plan that covers these factors will definitely eliminate any fears your employer may have about letting you work from home.

Layout your tools

What’s a workman without his tools? Definitely an ordinary man. Sure, you may have lofty dreams of helping your employer build an empire through remote working, but how exactly do you intend to do that? What tools do you intend to use?

A huge part of remote working boils down to the tools used. You would need to choose remote-friendly web tools for communication and collaboration. Platforms like Slack and Zoom (for visual meetings) will do the trick.

Similarly, you could also use Dropbox for sharing files and documents. This way, working from home will be a breeze for both you and your employer.

Suggest a trial period

Just like we stated earlier, there’s a huge chance that your boss would not be comfortable with the idea of letting his employees work from home. If this is the case, you could go on to suggest a trial period that could last for two weeks or less. Within this period, you would work from home to determine how the new arrangement would affect your productivity.

It’s also an opportunity to identify any problems you didn’t anticipate and work them out before your boss makes a final decision.

Final Thoughts

Working from home is quite easy and exciting, especially for millennials. However, getting your boss to share your enthusiasm about it is the tricky part.

Fortunately, these tips would help you get the answer you’re looking for. In the unlikely event that they don’t, you could always try again or search for remote-friendly companies that are hiring. Good luck!

Author: James Baxter
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James Baxter is professional ghostwriter, editor at write my essay and blogger, who loves sharing his experience and knowledge with readers. He is especially interested in marketing, blogging, and IT. James is always happy to visit different places and meet new people there.

Andres for JobisJob

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