Virtual Job Search: 3 Tips for Job Seekers

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, CV writing, Job interviews, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

In just a few short months so much has changed in the world, let alone in the UK. Industries, schools, homes, and healthcare were thrown into disarray as the pandemic took hold and spread from country to country.

Now, finally, there is light on the horizon. Hiring freezes are easing gradually as the lockdown eases and the country navigates its way into a social-distance compliant future. For job seekers, the major changes will be in the job search and job logistics. It is less likely that a job candidate will meet with a recruiter or hiring manager in person and more likely to be a virtual job search experience. Likewise, many employers are strengthening their remote workforces and hiring on a work-from-home (WFH) and work-from-anywhere (WFA) basis.

When you are looking for your new job opportunity you might find that you are invited to interviews via Zoom or a similar video conferencing software app. To get the best from a virtual job search take a look at our tips below.

Virtual Job Search Video interview

Photo by Allie on Unsplash.

The New Virtual Job Search

There is increased competition for jobs compared to the start of the year. To stand out, make sure your CV is up to date, that your most relevant experience shines through. CVs should be easy to read, fuss-free, and each job listed should include the relevant tasks that suit the job you are applying for.

Job advertising will remain online with job sites picking up more and more new jobs over the coming weeks and months. Stay ahead of the competitors by signing up to job alerts for the roles that interest you most. That way you will have them delivered straight to your inbox.

Be ready to apply quickly for new jobs as some employers start the interview process as applications come in. Getting your application in first could see you getting in front of the hiring manager sooner than others,” says Ken Little, a career writer at Australia2Write and Write My X.

Practice Your Virtual Interview Skills

You may have been on video call during lockdown for work and fun, and would be forgiven for thinking a virtual interview would be similar. Though the technology is the same, a virtual interview will be much more formal than even the work calls you have had. When you are invited to a video interview make sure you have the all right details. You should know who you are meeting, when the interview is, and what technology is being used. Don’t assume anything, ask for details if they are not given up front.

Practising your interview skills beforehand is a must for any job process. With virtual interviews, it is more important than ever. Rope in a friend or two to play the role of interviewer and set up a mock interview video call. Mock interviews are a great way for you to build confidence and spot any nervous tics you need to manage.

Whatever the job, always dress appropriately and preferably professionally for your interview no matter where or how it takes place.

On the day of your interview, find a quiet spot in your home where you won’t be distracted or disturbed. Clear any clutter from around so there are no distractions that might catch the hiring managers eye. “Switch on your camera before you interview so you can see in advance if the space around you is clear and close the door so no pets or kids come in,” says Hugo Davy, an editor at Britstudent and Nextcoursework.

Keep An Open Mind

It goes without saying that some industries and professions have been hit harder by Covid-19. These will be slower to restart the hiring process as they try to rebuild. This means that for many people the next job move may require them to adapt or pivot in their careers or take the advice of Sheryl Sandberg and move sideways when you can’t move up. This can be daunting but can also lead to great opportunities that you maybe hadn’t considered previously.

Adapting does not have to mean changing industry or profession completely but can also mean using your skills and experience in a new way. Keep an open mind when seeking a job and be aware of all your abilities, not just those you have used in your most recent employment.

Author: Michael Dehoyos
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Michael is a job editor at PhD Kingdom and Assignment Writing Service. He assists companies in their hiring strategy concepts, and contributes to numerous sites and publications. Also, he is a writer at Origin Writings.

CV Writing Tips for Landing Your Dream Internship

This entry was posted in Careers advice, CV writing, Uncategorized and tagged , , on by Andres Herrera.

An internship could be your first step into a dream career. Unfortunately, however, places are often limited to school leavers and graduates all vying for the same positions.

To secure an interview you will need to outdo the competition with a really strong CV. Let’s take a look at some top CV writing tips to help you get that internship.

Writing a CV for an internship position

Photo by KOBU Agency on Unsplash

Before you start

Before you rush off and start writing your CV, you need to do some research. Check the internship’s job description to find out everything you can about the role you are applying for.

You should check:

  1. Which keywords have been used?
  2. Which skills are needed?
  3. What experience do they want?

You will also need to know more about the company and industry in general.

Now you know what the employer is looking for, you should aim to demonstrate why you are the perfect fit by including it in your CV.

Writing your CV

When it comes to writing your CV, keep the recruiter in mind at all times. Thanks to your research, you know exactly what they are looking for — so tell them what they want to hear! Of course, you could always hire a professional CV writing service to do this for you.

Divide your CV into these five sections:

1. Contact details

Contact details are an absolute must on your CV. Include your name, address, telephone number and email so the recruiters can get back to you if (and when) you are successful.

2. Personal statement

Add a personal statement to your CV to briefly tell the employer why you will be perfect for the internship position. Don’t go over the top — a short paragraph detailing who you are, what you can offer and your career aims is enough.

3. Employment history

As someone taking their first steps into the industry, you may not have an extensive and relevant employment history — don’t worry, we’ll discuss that later.

But if you do have the industry-relevant experience, make sure to include it. Add your role, the name of the company, its location, website and the dates you were employed.

Next, detail your responsibilities and successes for each role — again, make sure to highlight any achievements that suit the role you are applying for.

4. Education and qualifications

Add your education plus any academic or professional qualifications you might have. Include the name of the institution, qualification and dates you attended.

If your recent school or university education is relevant to the internship you are applying to you can give your education more prominence, particularly if you are lacking relevant work experience.

5. Other skills

Finally, an ‘other skills’ section is a great place to include extra-curricular activities that are relevant to the internship. If you have done any volunteering that your potential employer will find attractive, then make sure to add it, highlighting the internship-relevant parts.

Overall, you should keep your CV to a maximum of two A4 pages in length.

What to do if you lack experience

The reason you are applying for an internship is probably that you want to gain more industry-relevant work experience. So what should you do to make sure your CV shines if you haven’t already worked in that industry?

  1. Highlight relevant strengths. Just because you may not have had a job in the industry, that doesn’t mean you have no experience at all. Work experience, volunteering, community and academic projects all count. Remember to highlight skills that you know the company is looking for.
  2. Push your best skills. If you are going to include more general skills, make sure you back them up with relevant examples. For example, if a company is looking for someone who is a “team player”, then you might want to highlight a time you worked successfully in a group. Wherever possible, include tangible results such as a percentage increase in sales.
  3. Utilise the layout. You don’t have to stick to the traditional method of laying out a CV in chronological order. Instead, put your most relevant experience at the top to highlight your most applicable skills to the role.
  4. Include a cover letter. Cover letters are a great way to highlight your most relevant skills and how they will benefit the company you want an internship with. Include a cover letter and let the recruiter know why you are the person they are looking for.

Conclusion: CV Writing Tips for Landing Your Dream Internship

Writing a CV for an internship and writing a CV for a job are very similar skills.

You always want to know what the employer is looking for and then demonstrate, with tangible results, why you have those skills.

Similarly, there are things in both you definitely don’t want to include. Typos are a big no-no, as are jargon, buzzwords and lies.

The main difference between the two CVs is that when you apply for an internship you may not yet have the relevant work experience. Instead, highlight other areas of your life that demonstrate why you are going to be an asset to the company during your time there.

Author: Andrew Arkley
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Andrew is the founder of PurpleCV, one of the UK’s leading CV writing providers. He has personally written over 3,000 CVs, has over 15 years’ experience in recruitment at a senior level and has conducted thousands of interviews, so he knows precisely what it takes to land a job!

 

 

How to Get Your CV Noticed by the Right People

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, CV writing and tagged , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

So, you’ve decided it’s time to find a new job and you’ve created a killer CV to help you do it.

Now you need to elevate your job search and ensure your CV is being seen by the people who’ll give you access to the role of your dreams. But how can you do this?

With so much competition for the top roles, it’s essential to get in the mindset of a marketer and ensure your CV is being seen by the right people.

In the guide below, we’ll look at five ways you can get your CV noticed and secure yourself that all-important interview.

How to Get Your CV Noticed by the Right People

Start with a strong CV

Before your CV is seen, you need to make sure it’s up to scratch. This means choosing a clear and concise layout which enables the recruiter to quickly find the information they need.

Be sure to highlight your relevant key skills, top achievements, qualifications and previous work experience. Also, use keywords and skills from the job description throughout, to prove to the recruiter that you’re a good fit for the role.

Additionally, before you do anything with your CV, you need to make sure you’ve proofread it several times. If you submit an application that is full of mistakes, you might stand out – but for all the wrong reasons!

Sign up to job boards

Once you’ve written a strong CV, it’s time to start putting it out there. One of the best ways to find the best roles and get noticed is by signing up to job boards.

It might sound simple, but most candidates don’t utilise this trick – and recruiters often use the sites to search for potential hires.

Simply register for your chosen job board(s) and upload a generic version of your CV. You can even sign up for email alerts from each job board, so relevant roles are sent straight to your inbox as soon as they’re live.

Go to a recruitment agency

In today’s digital world, it might seem a little outdated (and sometimes daunting) to meet with recruiters face-to-face. But this can be a highly beneficial way to get your CV in front of the right people.

Their job is to find you a job, so it’s in their best interest to work closely with you and get your CV out to the right employers!

If you do decide to meet with a recruiter, treat it like an interview. Go along with a copy of your CV, make sure you’re looking smart and be confident in your abilities. The better the impression you leave, the keener they’ll be to put you forward for an interview.

Make the most of social media

Using social media is a fantastic way to be proactive in your job search.

Platforms like Facebook have industry-specific job pages where people can share their vacancies. What’s more, searching for hashtags or following your favourite companies online can help you to find other exciting job opportunities.

However, LinkedIn is the obvious winner in terms of job searching. Make sure your profile is complete and up-to-date, with a professional photo, and turn your career interests to ‘on’. This lets potential employers and recruiters know that you’re open to new opportunities.

Consider sending speculative applications

A speculative application is one in which you send your CV and cover letter to an organisation you would like to work for, to enquire about any vacancies. This is done despite the fact they aren’t actively advertising any roles.

Writing speculative applications can be tricky at first, but once you get to grips with this it can be a great way to find your dream role.

To send a speculative application, you’ll need to create a tailored cover letter, which you’ll paste into the body of the email. You should discuss why you’d be interested working for the specific company (generic emails won’t get you anywhere), what type of role you’d like to be considered for and why you’d make a great hire. Remember to attach your CV and add your contact details to your signature.

Get your CV noticed

If you want to ensure your CV is being seen by the right people, then you need to be proactive in your job search. Rather than simply applying to job advertisements, get your CV noticed by following the steps above. You’ll be on your way to securing a job interview before you know it!

Author: Andrew Fennell
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Andrew is the founder of CV writing advice website StandOut CV. He is a former recruitment consultant and contributes careers advice to websites like Business Insider, The Guardian and FastCompany.

5 Tips to Make your CV Stand Out

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, CV writing and tagged , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

While your CV used to be an extensive biography – listing your complete working history in full detail – that won’t do the job in the current market anymore. The digital age completely changed the recruitment industry.

Today, duplicating your CV is as simple as copy and paste, which is why everybody is doing that… recruiters are being flooded by digital CVs! Recruiters don’t read your CV in the first round anymore. They scan. In other words… your first impression is more important than ever. You have to stand out. Fortunately, there are some simple strategies that will do exactly that.

CV building items

Rule #1: Realise… the CV is not about you

I have seen so many people enthusiastically starting their CV with ‘I am a hardworking, motivated individual that is looking for a challenging position in […]’. The mistake? It says nothing and with that single sentence, you are exactly like everybody else and lost your authenticity.

Today, everyone is ‘hard-working’ and ‘motivated’ (and ‘flexible’). When I read that sentence, I literally think: ‘Oh, here we have another hard-worker.’ The terminology is way overused and you know what… what does that even mean!?

Remove these vague statements/opinions at all times and SHOW the recruiter that you are hardworking by listing all your achievements.

Your CV used to be your biography, but in today’s job market, you should change that CV perspective. Write your CV solely about what THEY are looking for. Stand out by thinking about THEM.

You see… the recruiters’ job is simple; finding the best possible candidate and making sure that that candidate is a SAFE CHOICE. He is looking for skills, achievements and relevant knowledge that proves that you will be able to do the job. Your job is simple. List everything the recruiter is looking for, making you that safe choice!

Don’t waste valuable CV space with writing what YOU want. Focus only on the key aspects that will make you an interesting candidate. And then, in the interview, you can talk all about yourself and figure out if you are a match.

Rule #2: Be the specialist, not the generalist

Would you hire a common doctor of a specialised (expensive) brain surgeon when you need brain surgery? I thought so… and so are recruiters.

Often, the company has an open position because of a specific problem. You need to figure out what that is and be the SPECIFIC solution to that problem. Meaning, if their job is all about email optimisation; they are not that interested in ‘just’ a marketer; stand out by being the ‘psychological email marketer’, and write all your relevant achievements/projects towards these key differentiating aspects.

One more example of being the specialist instead of the generalist is with the skills section. I have seen so many candidates, making endless lists of their skills or responsibilities, losing focus of what they are and thus becoming ‘no one’ in that massive CV pile. You should pick the 5 most important skills and stick with them; in fact, make them the red line throughout your CV and you will be instantly perceived as the expert in those areas!

Rule #3: Use a standout CV design

Imagine the recruiter looking at the 50th CV of the day, all looking the same, and then there is your CV that is designed for the first impression. My secret? Include a sidebar in your CV and use this space to highlight your greatest value to the company. This could be either skills, achievements or smart interests/motivation.

Including a sidebar has a psychological benefit as it will stand out in the first few critical seconds, setting the context of the rest of your CV. Meaning… if you highlight how you have the right skills, the recruiter will unconsciously look for confirmation of those highlighted skills in the rest of your CV. You can choose where the recruiter will focus on!

Furthermore, including eye-catching items like skill-indicators or a work-experience timeline will automatically draw the attention of the recruiter, making sure he can’t ignore you.

CV Builder tool

Tip: While these items might be hard to create in a text editor. The online cv builder cv-template.com is specialised in stand-out CV designs. Just follow the CV format and you will have a professional-looking CV in a matter of minutes (every CV format supports this clever sidebarstrategy).

Rule #4: Include Stories in your CV

Humans love stories. In fact, after hearing a resonating story, your body releases the hormone oxytocin, literally boosting emotions like trust and empty. Meaning… instead of being ‘just a candidate’, you can make an emotional connection with the recruiter. Simply by writing appealing stories in your CV.

You might already know that including bullet points in your work experience descriptions improve readability. But you can take these bullets to the next level, converting them into complete ministories that arouses curiosity. (And give you amazing speak material during the job interview!).

The purpose of these story-bullets is not to explain the full story. You should create just enough curiosity to make you an interesting candidate, and thus getting you that ticket to the interview. It’s simple; explain in a 2-3 sentence what you did, what the result was, and a little about the context. Moreover, make the story specific (using exact numbers & percentages) to improve trustworthiness and memory retention.

An example of a bullet point could be; “Increased online conversion in 2 months with 26%, from 1200 to 1512 customers per month, by optimising headlines, bullet points and call to actions.”

Specific, interesting and to the point!

Rule #5: Let every word add value

You might have heard this one before. But still… on average 50-60% of the words on a CV doesn’t have to be there! They take up valuable space but even worse, they actually harm your chances; because either you don’t know how to write a CV or you don’t have anything better to show!

Make sure your sentences are as compact as possible. Remove useless details and focus solely on the most important aspects. And, at all times, avoid vague words like ‘many’, ‘considerably’ or ‘a lot’ – be specific!

As a final check, go through your CV one last time and ask yourself ‘does every word add value’? Are the main keywords there?

After that, look at the readability of the CV design. Have you broken up large text blocks to make it more inviting to start reading? Are you using the same styling consistently throughout your CV? (My CV builder does this for you). And… are all the asked requirements there?

Finally, use the free tool Grammarly to check the spelling and off you go – having increased your chances drastically! Take 2 hours to optimise your CV and your job search will be so much easier. You won’t regret it.

Author: Wouter Lenting
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Wouter is the founder of the free CV builder CV-Template, a tool that allows everyone to create a professionally designed CV with ease. With over 350,000 CVs created, the tool has become a leading CV maker online. 

10 tips on how your resume should look like in 2019

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, CV writing, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , on by Ixone.

You made your list with all the changes you want for 2019? If one of these changes is to find a better job – that means that it is worth making the best of your chances. The good news for you is that year after year, employers look after people ready to adapt and have a touch of creativity; the only thing you need to do is to use this in your advantage and find your desired job.resume tipsSource: Unsplash

When we are referring to look for a new opportunity or changing the current job, the CV, namely what it looks like and what it contains, is extremely important. And if you manage to make it attractive to recruits, you are likely to be called for job interviews in a fairly short time. And although the structure of a CV does not differ greatly from one profile to another, what differentiates you from other candidates is what your CV contains! Now let’s see how a resume should look like.

1. Revise your resume’s look and feel

Sending the same old CV, with nothing update from a couple of years can be a real problem in getting your dream job. As you already know, this first interaction can make your employer to call you for the interview or to find another candidate.

Candidates often abstain from specifying their professional goal in their resume, but in 2019, they should not miss. It’s enough to say a few words about yourself, who you are, what you can offer to the company, and what are the goals of your career. Also, here, do not forget to adjust your goal depending on the role you are applying.

2. Amend your header and Choose your words carefully

May sound pretty simple, but you will be surprised how many forget to check their resumes before sending them. That’s the way you need to read it multiple times and don’t forget about grammatical mistakes. A clear mind is always welcome – why don’t you ask a friend or an acquaintance, who have some free time, to help you and check how good is your work. There is no excuse for spelling mistakes in your CV.

Don’t forget to follow some basic structure:

- Try to answer this simple question: How do you want to look like in front of your possible employer through a paper?
- Show the required skills through some specific activities you had in other professional experience
- Keep everything simple – don’t try to make your presentation too hard to follow

Too many words = agglomeration = confusion = refusal. It does not matter how impressive you are doing at work if it’s impossible for you to sum it up on a page. Eliminates all the details in addition and keeps the essentials, cut out mercilessly both from the sections where you organize your resume and the words you use. For each thing you write you have to ask yourself: will this improve the way the employer sees me?

3. Choose simple font

These details are an important aspect which many employers look at. In this case, you should try to be careful at this and use a classic font – you will never fail with this!
resume tips 10Source Unsplash

4. Respect your reader

Don’t be, in your way to keep the resume as simple as possible, too modest. Details regarding your experience, your firm name, address and some information about your position held there are equally important.

Let’s take, for example, the situation in which you are working for a very well-known firm – like Google, Apple or Amazon; in this case, you must describe your position over there as not many know how these things work. Moreover, you can give some numbers regarding your firm evolution/status and if you helped in this matter. For sure, people like to see how important you can be and if you can give 100% to another employer as well.

In your way in creating the best resume ever, try to avoid the most common mistakes you can make – like spelling/ grammar errors.

5. Building a resume for a specific career

An ideal CV should contain up to two pages, but for sure you already know this information. Anyhow, try to leave some details for the job interview. Practically, with your CV you should attract the recruiter so that he wants to know you better and contact you for a face to face meeting. If you are applying for a change of career then you need to build your CV in this matter – even if your professional history is not in that domain, for sure you did some projects which used that specific field of activity.

6. Offer the best first

Have you been rewarded for your hard work in your professional life? Then don’t forget to write about that! If you were a speaker, an event moderator, or just received a diploma; write that down. Any employer wants to see that a possible employee worked for developing his/her skills, and they will do the same.

7. Bolster your Key Skills and Technologies section with new additions

Hard skill or soft skill? Why don’t you try to say how good you’ve become in the last few years? If in your resume format keep these details which will make you shine. If you are just finishing college, then don’t worry – for sure you’ve been part of some important project, you won some medals, or you’ve been the best in some class.

8. Include your current position

Although your previous jobs are important to the recruiter, however, the last job you have had is the most relevant for a future employer. And here you should adapt the role to the one you have applied to, namely, to specify what you did at the previous job and what is appropriate for the job that the company was doing.
resume 2019Source: Unsplash

9. Create an online portfolio

Living in an ingrowing online development you need to be sure that you can be there if an employer is looking for their future employee. So, in this matter start creating an online portfolio – if you have any questions how to make a resume you can look for a UK essay writer. The numbers of people using this kind of interaction are growing, year after year, and statistic say that 71% of firms have been influenced in their decision by this small, but important aspect.

10. Consider your cover letter

You didn’t think that there is a possibility to be selected if you have a cover letter? Then, you should know that those who send a cover letter, even if this is optional, had bigger chances of being selected. Being clear, but respecting the structure and the topic, you can catch the firm attention.


Author’s Bio Harry Southworth

Being in the field of the employer for more than ten years, he knows what aspects are the best to follow when it comes to getting a job. Harry Southworth was one of the best HR managers and that’s why he knows all the secrets from the employer point of view. He succeeded to choose the right people and he never regretted his choices.