Tag Archives: Job hunting

5 Common Interviewing Mistakes Recruiters Should Avoid

This entry was posted in Advice for recruiters and tagged , , on by Andres Herrera.

Recruiting a team is one of the most important processes inside the company for many reasons. The major one is that the professional skill qualities of your employees will become the quality of your business. And yes, the HR managers are the ones who choose the right people for the right positions, which means failure isn’t an option here. Yet, there are some common interviewing mistakes that headhunting team members make still. Let’s see why they are important to avoid and how to do it.

Hiring interview

Photo by CoWomen on Unsplash.

1. Making too many assumptions

You may have five+ years of experience in recruiting everybody: from C-level managers to seasonal workers. You may visit (or conduct your own) masterclass on the peculiarities of the hiring process and how to make the perfect professional match to happen at the workplace. All that can give you a feel like you can scan a candidates’ resumes video or written format, analyze the in-person presentation at the interview, and see if this candidate will fit the position. This is exactly where you need to turn your Mr/Mrs/Ms-Know-It-All off and get involved in the process here and now as this neglectful approach can cost a valuable employee.

How to avoid it: Always get back to the position description when you start sourcing. This will keep you on track with who you are looking for now. The good idea is to map out the qualities/skill set for a particular position, so you know for sure what is crucial and what is complementary. Another advice is to ask an interviewee the questions before coming up with your answers.

2. Seeking for an ideal candidate

Another one from the common HR mistakes list is to pour all the effort, time, and resources for hunting for the 100% exact match. However tempting and real this idea might seem, it rarely works in real life as there are many factors that one should consider at the same time. Looking for the resume that corresponds to every single specified must-have is a time-consuming work in vain.

How to avoid it: Divide the needed skillset into Must-Haves, Good-to-Haves, and Personal-Haves (the individual qualities that may be beneficial to the particular job). The candidate who scores most of those three might be the one who can match the job but, again: those are just a few factors of many.

3. Not checking references

It’s hard to check all the facts mentioned by a candidate in a resume – after all, you aren’t an FBI or MI5 agent. However, you do want to know whether the person has worked at the mentioned position (especially if we are talking about the top-management level) or not, what their supervisors have to say about the professionalism of the candidate, and how has the person recommended him/herself while working in the particular environment.

How to avoid it: Always check the reference background, if given. You can arrange a phone conversation or write an email to the person. And remember: that is just one point of view of many so keep the collected information in mind but don’t just jump into conclusion unless heard the other side as well. This is one of some common HR interviewing mistakes as well.

4. Using too much/too little social channels

Professional and personal social media channels have become a valuable source of information about the candidate’s professional and individual traits that the resume or cover letter doesn’t include. Abusing scrolling profiles may set a trap as you may stop perceiving him or her as a candidate but will look at the profile from the other user perspective. Not deploying it at all will leave out the precious touch on their personality and communicational style. So what do recruiters make as a compromise?

How to avoid it: Because social media isn’t and shouldn’t be the main tool for recruiting, your usage of it should be situational and additional. If you gathered enough information about a candidate’s fitness into your corporate culture, you don’t need to see memes reposting.

5. Asking confusing questions (or not asking at all)

Even after a thorough study of their resume, social media profiles, and other information, you still may have a lot of questions you’d like the candidate to answer. This is a great path to follow. What can happen though is that the candidate misunderstands questions, and that’s why the person fails at answering them. What if one doesn’t know how to list languages on a resume, left that space blank, and you put the resume aside right after the interview without asking whether one has proficiency in any? That’s right, another oversight of possibly great employees due to these common HR mistakes.

How to avoid it: Make a list of questions to clarify the information (for instance, asking whether one has learned a foreign language) and those that you haven’t found the answers yet.

Hiring people and creating an efficient team is indeed a subtle art, but realizing the common HR interviewing mistakes one can make on this journey helps the recruiters stay alert and adjust their approach when needed. Just make sure you don’t forget that recruitment and hiring are, first of all, about real people and not our ideas or assumptions about them.

Author: Laura Garbers
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Laura is a lead recruiting specialist and an editor at Craft Resumes. She considers hiring as architecture for business and explores how going digital and remote recruiting influences both online and offline based companies.

It’s Never Too Late To Change Your Career

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, Working life and tagged , , , on by Andres Herrera.

The average working person is likely to change careers between five and seven times during their life, according to career change statistics. There are many reasons why a person’s career goals shift to a different perspective but, regardless of the reason, it can be a daunting prospect, particularly in later life.

What was previously set in stone that we stay in the same job for 40 or more years has changed considerably in the modern world so that, currently, revamping yourself and career is becoming the norm. The question is how to go about it to keep a work-life balance that brings both happiness and financial security to a newfound career change.

Focus on the positives

If you’re over 50, you’re in a prime position to transfer your skills to a new career move: with plenty of knowledge and working experience, there’s no need to shy away from jumping into a new profession.

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Instead of focusing on the negatives such as your age, competition from younger workers, or financial issues, capitalise on the positive attributes you have. If you’re not the retiring type, working in later life will keep your mind sharper, your body fitter, and give you healthier financial independence for when you do decide to stop working. Now you have the maturity, long term commitment, and stability on your side that younger candidates won’t have.

Take your time to research

On the surface, it can be a drastic decision to make a career change later in life but providing you do your research and avoid making quick decisions, there’s nothing to stop you from making a successful transition. Whether you choose to launch your own business or sidestep to another company with better prospects, it’s essential to prepare yourself as much as possible.

Over the years, you have probably developed numerous marketable skills so determine which ones are best suited to the new position you want to apply for. It’s also a good idea to update your CV and if necessary, get professional help to hone in on all your positive attributes.

Build up a network

With years of experience on your side, the chances are that you’ve built up a considerable amount of contacts associated with your working sector and now is the time to use them.

Reach out to anyone who you think will be able to help you further your career in a different direction, from junior to senior positions so you can make significant connections in your new career choice. There are many ways to establish a path into a new work move so it would also be advisable to join professional networks and groups to become even more in tune with people and any organisational aspects of your potential career to make things easier.

… and change your career

If you concentrate on what you really want to do, possibly for the rest of your life, you’ll eventually conclude that it’s never too late to make the change, so you should just go for it!

Author: Cassandra McNulty

Recruitment Chatbots: ‘You talking to me?’

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, Job interviews and tagged , , , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

AI-powered chatbots are everywhere. You’ve probably met them when buying a flight ticket or solving a problem with your bank account. Lately, they have transformed our consumer experience. And now recruitment chatbots are taking over some relevant aspects of the hiring processes, specially in pre-screening or pre-qualification tests.

recruitment chatbots

Like any other chatbot, it is a software designed to conduct a conversation, understand human language, and simulate human behavior. The technologies behind are well known by their acronyms, AI (artificial intelligence) and NLP (natural language processing).

In HR, recruitment chatbots are used to reduce time and help with repetitive or inefficient tasks. If you think that talking to people at work sometimes is time consuming and makes it hard to deal with more important issues, imagine life before bots, when recruiters had to call hundreds of applicants for a single position just to check some basic requirements.

What are recruitment chatbots used for?

The most extended use of HR chatbots is during the pre-screening process. Bots are designed to ask candidates a series of relevant questions for the position. Even before a human recruiter reads your CV, a bot can contact you to ask for important information, such as years of experience in a position, certain skills and studies, or a foreign language level.

With all these data ‘in mind’, recruitment chatbots decide if an applicant meets the basic requirements for the job or not. As a candidate, you should take into account that you will be assessed according to your answers, so be clear and provide all the relevant information as if it were a human-to-human conversation. Take these bots seriously and don’t waste the opportunity for being the selected one!

Jobseekers may also use them to their own advantage. They are available round-the-clock to answer queries about the job and the hiring process. You no longer have to spam recruiters with questions that are simple to answer. A chatbot can help you almost instantaneously.

Has everything gone well? The recruiter wants to schedule an interview? Chatbots can also help in this tedious task and match your appointment books.

But what does a recruitment chatbot conversation look like? Like many other chatbots, most of them are integrated with the most popular chat apps. This includes Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp, or it can be built in the recruiter’s webpage or recruitment platform. Sometimes you will forget you are talking to a bot, while at other times… well, you will remember that technology still has a lot to learn from us human beings!

Have you already chatted with a bot recruiter? How was your experience?

Doing what you love: Creative jobs for creative souls

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice and tagged , on by Jeannine.

For the creative souls looking for a creative job.

creative job record1


So you’re an artist, a musician, a designer, a chef. You grew up drawing on every piece of paper you got your hands on, spent hours sitting at the piano, and you made a promise to yourself that you’d spend your whole life refining a red wine reduction for the perfect sirloin steak. But in this age of technology and numbers, economics and finance, creative jobs may seem hard to come by. But still you try and you search every job engine site with keywords like “illustration,” “design,” “music,” and when you get desperate, “anything, just not a desk job. Please.”

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How social networking is changing the way we find work

This entry was posted in Articles, Social media and tagged , , , , , , on by plabram.

Most popular ways to find a jobThis is the first part of our week-long series on social media and employment.

When the social media revolution was in its early stages, few would have imagined that one day the networks would obtain the reach that they now have. As well as its omnipresence in the personal sphere, it seems as though social networking has also mushroomed out to include social media recruiting and the professional sphere.

Let’s take a look at the key facts and predictions involved in this trend, and – most importantly – how to use current trends to help you find a job (or employee).


More people than ever before use social media to find a job

Key stats

  • 16% of jobseekers have credited social media with finding their current job.
  • …that’s up from 11% two years previously.
  • This makes social media the 6th most common way to find a job, after internal listings, company careers sites, newspapers, referrals and – most frequently – internet job boards and job websites (like JobisJob :)).
  • Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn are rated as the top three social networks when it comes to finding work.
  • 94% of recruiters use or plan to use social media.
  • 78% of recruiters have hired a candidate found on social media.

Why has this change come about?

  • Increased amount of people using social networks: Facebook alone has gone from 1 million users at the end of 2004 to over a billion in March 2013. Wikipedia currently lists 16 virtual communities with over 100 million active users. With all these extra users, it’s inevitable that social networks would be used for jobs as well as everything else.
  • Employers are far happier hiring someone who comes with a personal reference than a complete stranger. Social networks make the most of this, and extend things by a couple of degrees of separation.

What will happen next?

We predict that the use of social networks to find a job will continue to grow, as we become increasingly comfortable with the idea of blurring the divide between our private and professional lives.

This said, we think online job boards and job aggregators will still continue to be a (the?) most important way to find a job. We are, admittedly, somewhat biased, but we think that being able to come up with a comprehensive list of job adverts in your local area from a few keywords is too helpful to jobseekers for them not to be.

What should I be doing now?

Sources: Jobvite Social Recruiting Survey and Job Seeker Survey, Yahoo news.

You can search for jobs in your LinkedIn and Facebook networks using JobisJob’s “My Network” tool. Once activated, this will highlight all the job postings that appear in companies where friends from your extended networks are currently employed, allowing you to obtain that all-important personal recommendation and use social media to find a job.

Social media week on JobisBlog