Tag Archives: remote working

2020: What we’ve learnt

This entry was posted in Articles, New Year, Working life and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

2020, the year the Covid-19 pandemic broke into our lives, was especially hard for most of us. It forced us to get used to a new reality in a matter of days. Some changes were already there but they got accelerated. The impact was felt in every sphere: mentally, physically, on the economy… and of course, on how we work.

Remote working

One of our guest writers remarked that 70% of UK workers will be working flexibly even after the Covid (‘Why the work from home revolution is coming’). More versatility, a better work-life balance, and, according to some studies, higher productivity are on the ‘pros’ side of this new experience.

Of course, not everything is positive. There is enough evidence to support that there is value in presential work: spontaneous, face-to-face exchange with colleagues makes collaboration easier, allows co-creation, and possibly results in a more integrated team. We still need to find a formula to combine the benefits without affecting the production of collective intelligence.

Time management

The future of smart working depends much on our individual capacity to adapt without affecting our efficiency or personal routine. According to one of our recent articles, we should ‘try to recreate the structure that comes with working onsite by limiting distractions and setting boundaries’ at home.

Recommendations for remote working efficiently and in a healthy way have filled newspaper pages, taken up our LinkedIn feed and thousands of Twitter threads. If you’re still struggling to adapt to it, here are a few tips.

Emerging jobs

The pandemic not only showed how valuable our healthcare system and professionals are. It also revealed a shortage of trained workers in this sector, especially nurses, doctors, and support workers. For those professionals and students who are still formulating their future, the Covid crisis has opened the potential for developing more meaningful and contributive careers for society.

As the distribution of goods has become increasingly important for the economy, the Logistics sector is creating jobs on a massive scale. But it is not limited to this: professionals in Education, Finance, IT, and Construction are also highly in demand.

New job search technologies

Recruitment also adapted and reshaped at a very fast rate. Companies accelerated the implementation of some emerging technologies to continue hiring despite all odds.

Video interviews have become the new norm throughout the entire hiring process. Evaluations, questionnaires, and even contracts are signed online. Paperwork became paperless.

Other tools being implemented, such as AI-powered software used by recruiters to manage their hiring process and chatbots that enable a fluid exchange between candidates and companies.

And as for job seekers, conducting a virtual job search is mandatory now. Fortunately, most candidates are already aware of search engines such as JobisJob to browse and apply in a fast and simple way.

There’s always hope

It has been a great opportunity to appreciate our own ability to adapt and to learn. We learnt how to work and live smarter, how resilient we are, and above all, we also learnt that physical distance is not a barrier to stay connected and accomplish things together.

Freelance Jobs You Can Enjoy While Studying at University

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice and tagged , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

Being at university comes with a lot of new things. Your schedule is not as strict as in high school, and you can have classes all day. You get to know a lot of new people and hang out with them. You need to study, to write your assignments, and take your exams.

And you need money. Students’ lives are filled with parties, traveling, adventure, presents, friends, and many things to do. Even though you can do all these on a budget, earning your own money opens a new door.

But not all jobs are suited for students. You need a flexible job that allows you to learn and develop yourself in university and have time for yourself. And, ideally, you need a job that does not require you to go to the office.

Freelance jobs are for students that want to make some money while studying at university. Before you start searching for a job, think about these 6 freelance jobs you can have as a student.

Freelance Jobs for Students

Photo by Per Lööv on Unsplash

1. Freelance Writer

Freelancing jobs come with the flexibility you need as a student. You can work from your dormitory. All you need to do is to find a job that you can enjoy while studying at university. Being a freelance writer is one of these jobs that can help you develop your skills while making money.

Essay writers from Uni Assignment Help say that there are many types of writings or content you can create. For example, you can be a ghostwriter and write articles on topics that are of interest to you. You can be a content creator or a copywriter, thus you will interact more with the marketing world. Or you can be a technical writer and learn more about the technical world.

There are many subtypes of freelance writer jobs, you only need to find the one right for you. This job will help you develop your creativity, critical thinking, and communication skills.

2. Online Tutor

Now that almost all activities have shifted online due to the Covid-19 pandemic, you can easily find freelancing jobs that can easily be included in your agenda. Online tutoring is one of these jobs. You can choose a subject you are good at and offer your help to people who do not understand it so well.

The world of online tutoring is constantly developing, and if you are more of a night-owl, you can be an online tutor for people from the other side of the globe. The same is valid for the case in which you are more productive during the day.

You can teach other people English or foreign languages, such as Spanish, Japanese, French, and so on. Or help them understand complex topics from Maths, Informatics, Chemistry, Music, History, and others.

3. Tester

Now that the technological world is discovering more and more, new products, services, apps, or websites appear in the online world. However, much of these are developed by small teams of people that begin their journey in the world of entrepreneurship.

They are looking for people to test their products. There are two types of testing: manual and automatic. Manual testing requires you to use the product and look for bugs. Automatic testing is what happens behind, where you create automatic tests and you need to have knowledge of coding.

If you do not know anything about coding, you can be a freelance manual tester. Just navigate the website, use the product or the service, and test its functionalities.

4. Social Media Manager

It’s not a secret anymore that the new generations are the most prepared to use the technology. If you love spending time on social media, you can be a freelance social media manager. You probably already know all the tips and tricks for a useful use of social media channels, so this job suits you like a glove.

There are many companies and businesses that are looking for creative and well-informed people to work as social media managers. So, if you like this domain, you will surely find something right for you.

5. Graphic Designer

If you are very creative, artistic, and love graphic design, then maybe you can get a job as a graphic design freelancer. This job gives you the flexibility you need while you are in university, while also helping you improve your skills.

The more you practice, the better you will be. And this experience as a graphic design freelancer can turn to be pretty valuable when you will add it to your resume. However, the competition in the freelancing world of design is fierce, so you need to offer professionalism and ingenuity. You can sign up for accounts on freelancing platforms dedicated to the graphic design world and add your works and build your portfolio.

6. Web Developer

Even the most skeptical people have begun to admit that the online world can help you promote your business. However, many of these people do not have the time or the knowledge to develop their websites, so there is a constant demand for web developers.

You do not need to know how to code to be a web developer. There are many platforms that can help you build a catchy and nice website. Some of them are more intuitive, while others are more complex. But if you practice and learn everything about them, you will be able to develop a website efficiently.

Freelance jobs are the right solution

While studying at university, you discover a new world. You need to learn for your exams, write your assignments, party with your friends, go out, and embark on adventures. But you also need money and a flexible and enjoyable job, so freelancing is the right solution.

There are many jobs you can do as a freelancer, but it all depends on your skills, passions, and interests. You can be a freelance writer, online tutor, or web developer. There is also a demand for graphic designers, social media managers, or testers. Just find the job right for you and start making money.

Author: Michael Gorman
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Michael is a highly skilled freelance writer and proofreader from the UK who currently works at Australia Assignment helper and College Paper reviews. He writes the Best Essay on topics such as freelancing, marketing, and business. Being interested in everyday development, he writes various blog posts and discovers new aspects of human existence every day.

Why the work from home revolution is coming

This entry was posted in Articles, Working life and tagged , , , on by Andres Herrera.

We’re all aware by now that COVID-19 has sparked a surge in flexible working across the UK. This began out of necessity, as working from home was advised wherever possible, but Britain’s workers have continued to stay at home in large numbers even after lockdown.

Although there is likely to be more of a return to normal working patterns once the COVID-19 crisis has fully passed, once the genie has escaped the bottle it’s hard to put it back in fully. As a new study from Direct Line shows, HR directors are expecting that 70% of UK workers will be working flexibly in one form or another after COVID-19. Here’s why the work from home revolution is on the way.

Work from home means greater freedom

The clue is in the name: flexible working allows workers to have more flexibility and freedom in how they balance their home and work lives. Whether they choose to work from home for only a few days a week, or even the whole week, workers have the power to choose the working pattern that suits them best.

The benefits of this are clear: working parents will be able to pick their children up from school, or work from home when they’re ill, for example. On the other end of the spectrum, the ability to work flexibly can be incredibly important for those workers who may have caring responsibilities for elderly parents.

When working from home can improve work-life balance to such a significant degree, many workers will be asking why they should be made to revert back to the traditional 9-5 in the office.

Mental health benefits

Work-related mental health problems are sadly a big problem across the UK, and working from home can help to alleviate this. As well as the improved work-life balance we’ve already covered, working from home benefits mental health in other ways too. One of the biggest positive changes is less time spent traveling to and from work. The daily commute can be a punishing ordeal for many workers – a life spent leaving home in the early morning, and returning late at night, can quickly become very depressing. Workers who commute long hours during the week have little time for anything else in their lives, and the experience itself can be stressful. Spending hours each day in cramped train carriages or in traffic jams is far from ideal for a lot of people.

Working from home (with no commute to worry about) can also allow more time for exercise during the working day: in the morning, evening, or even in the afternoon to break up the day. It goes without saying, of course, that the physical and mental health benefits of regular exercise are significant.

The tip of the iceberg

These are only a few of the most obvious benefits of working from home. The liberation of workers’ lives from a rigid, all-consuming work timetable can be hugely beneficial in a number of different ways. They can spend more time with their family, or on rewarding hobbies and activities, and all of this has the potential to increase their wellbeing.

The benefits for employees are clear, and it’s easy to see why demand is increasing from their point of view. But employers are starting to see the benefits, too, and this is another reason why the work from home revolution is coming. Happy workers are productive workers, and there is evidence to suggest that working from home could actually boost productivity – and save employers a fortune in office rental costs at the same time.

Author: Eliie Hayes

3 Tips for Better Time Management Working from Home

This entry was posted in Articles, Working life and tagged , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

According to statistics from LinkedIn, 82 percent of professionals would like to work from home one day a week or more, with 57 percent wanting to work from home three or more days.

COVID-19 has normalized remote work, and for many, it is more efficient. But there are some challenges that come with working remotely, not the least of which is time management.

Here are a few tips to make the most of your time when working from home:

Set Virtual Boundaries Between Work and Home

When working remotely, have a workspace away from the distractions of the rest of your home. Make sure you have everything you need to work within reach and good internet connectivity.

Try to stick to a set schedule. Allow for exceptions, of course, but try to guard against working around the clock. 

If possible, install Slack, Zoom, or whatever collaboration software your company uses, on your mobile phone. That way, even at the doctor’s office, you can respond to important messages, still be engaged, and get work done.

Turn off text messaging and personal email alerts while working remotely. They can distract you when working, and you want to make sure you stick with the schedule you set from beginning to end. Even if you only glance at these mini-interruptions or just delete spam emails as they come through, that time adds up. Before you know it, you may have wasted an hour.

When it comes to personal issues at home, spend your time and attention wisely. Focus on the big picture first, and you can worry about the details as time permits.

Of course, get your work done completely and on time.

Take Care of Your Mental Health

When you take a remote work job, you should adjust your expectations of yourself, your family, and the people you work with.

Your workday won’t look the same as it does in an office setting. Don’t necessarily expect lots of feedback, the way a boss might be able to provide onsite. If you self-evaluate, you won’t have to spend time waiting for feedback. 

Make sure you get enough sleep and eat right, and plan meal times so they don’t become another distraction.

Do larger tasks first unless you feel like you need a break to avoid burnout, in which case do small or easier tasks first or take a break before you dive into work. Do as much prep work as you can before you start a project. That way when you actually do it, things will go more efficiently. Avoid the trap of trying to multitask, and don’t procrastinate. Reach out for assistance as needed. You still have supervisors and colleagues as resources to offer guidance and advice even if you work remotely.

Learn patience, too. What seems like an emergency project may turn out to be something that can wait.

Embrace interruptions. Sometimes they’re just what you need to give yourself a mental time out.

Above all, always be mindful, relax and laugh often. Working from home doesn’t mean you can’t have fun.

Allow Yourself Flexibility

Use your own to-do lists or organizational tools that work for you in addition to whatever workflow software your company uses. Set project goals for yourself, and be prepared for the interruptions and realities of life, which will be a lot closer to you when you work remotely. 

Don’t bug your supervisors, but let them know if you’re swamped, and ask for extensions as needed.

When stressful projects are postponed or a personal emergency is settled, take the time to relish in the relief. Don’t just move on to the next thing. Internalize it and let it help you enjoy working remotely from a deep place. Time management should automatically become easier.

When you tackle a project at home, break large tasks down into small chunks (this is advice for any project).

Do each portion, and when you’ve finished a few, or feel yourself losing steam, give yourself a break.

When you’re ready to work again, move on to the next portion. Before you know it, you’ll be done.

In Closing

Working from home can be great. But you need strong time management skills. Try to recreate the structure that comes with working onsite by limiting distractions and setting boundaries. Take care of your mental health and use whatever resources you have available to make your workload manageable. 

Above all, enjoy the freedom and perks of working remotely, and consider these tips so you can manage your time successfully.

Author: Brad Wayland
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Brad is a business consultant and the Chief Strategy Officer at BlueCotton, a site with high-quality, easy-to-design custom t-shirts.

Virtual Job Search: 3 Tips for Job Seekers

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, CV writing, Job interviews and tagged , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

In just a few short months so much has changed in the world, let alone in the UK. Industries, schools, homes, and healthcare were thrown into disarray as the pandemic took hold and spread from country to country.

Now, finally, there is light on the horizon. Hiring freezes are easing gradually as the lockdown eases and the country navigates its way into a social-distance compliant future. For job seekers, the major changes will be in the job search and job logistics. It is less likely that a job candidate will meet with a recruiter or hiring manager in person and more likely to be a virtual job search experience. Likewise, many employers are strengthening their remote workforces and hiring on a work-from-home (WFH) and work-from-anywhere (WFA) basis.

When you are looking for your new job opportunity you might find that you are invited to interviews via Zoom or a similar video conferencing software app. To get the best from a virtual job search take a look at our tips below.

Virtual Job Search Video interview

Photo by Allie on Unsplash.

The New Virtual Job Search

There is increased competition for jobs compared to the start of the year. To stand out, make sure your CV is up to date, that your most relevant experience shines through. CVs should be easy to read, fuss-free, and each job listed should include the relevant tasks that suit the job you are applying for.

Job advertising will remain online with job sites picking up more and more new jobs over the coming weeks and months. Stay ahead of the competitors by signing up to job alerts for the roles that interest you most. That way you will have them delivered straight to your inbox.

Be ready to apply quickly for new jobs as some employers start the interview process as applications come in. Getting your application in first could see you getting in front of the hiring manager sooner than others,” says Ken Little, a career writer at Australia2Write and Write My X.

Practice Your Virtual Interview Skills

You may have been on video call during lockdown for work and fun, and would be forgiven for thinking a virtual interview would be similar. Though the technology is the same, a virtual interview will be much more formal than even the work calls you have had. When you are invited to a video interview make sure you have the all right details. You should know who you are meeting, when the interview is, and what technology is being used. Don’t assume anything, ask for details if they are not given up front.

Practising your interview skills beforehand is a must for any job process. With virtual interviews, it is more important than ever. Rope in a friend or two to play the role of interviewer and set up a mock interview video call. Mock interviews are a great way for you to build confidence and spot any nervous tics you need to manage.

Whatever the job, always dress appropriately and preferably professionally for your interview no matter where or how it takes place.

On the day of your interview, find a quiet spot in your home where you won’t be distracted or disturbed. Clear any clutter from around so there are no distractions that might catch the hiring managers eye. “Switch on your camera before you interview so you can see in advance if the space around you is clear and close the door so no pets or kids come in,” says Hugo Davy, an editor at Britstudent and Nextcoursework.

Keep An Open Mind

It goes without saying that some industries and professions have been hit harder by Covid-19. These will be slower to restart the hiring process as they try to rebuild. This means that for many people the next job move may require them to adapt or pivot in their careers or take the advice of Sheryl Sandberg and move sideways when you can’t move up. This can be daunting but can also lead to great opportunities that you maybe hadn’t considered previously.

Adapting does not have to mean changing industry or profession completely but can also mean using your skills and experience in a new way. Keep an open mind when seeking a job and be aware of all your abilities, not just those you have used in your most recent employment.

Author: Michael Dehoyos
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Michael is a job editor at PhD Kingdom and Assignment Writing Service. He assists companies in their hiring strategy concepts, and contributes to numerous sites and publications. Also, he is a writer at Origin Writings.