Tag Archives: trends

Using Talent Development as a Recruitment Strategy

This entry was posted in Advice for recruiters, Articles, Employment trends and tagged , , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

Continually upskilling and developing your team is no small feat. You need to have a great Learning and Development (L&D) strategy in place. Putting one together takes time, but having one in place can help boost productivity and, in turn, your organisation’s output. It is no wonder that, according to the 2019 L&D Report published by findcourses.co.uk, 72% of marketing-leading organisations have taken their L&D strategy even further: they have put it at the heart of their recruitment strategy. Keep reading to find out how your organisation can follow suit and use talent development to recruit.

Continue reading

How to Ask Your Boss About Remote Work After Coronavirus

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, Working life and tagged , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

Remote work used to be like a magical dream come true for a lot of employees before the coronavirus pandemic. Now that many employees have been forced to go through this experience for almost a year, many begin to think about what will happen after the crisis. Has this been a parenthesis in their ordinary working life or could it become a future reality? Whether you’re an essay writer or a graphic designer, working from home is definitely an exciting concept that gives you all the flexibility you need.

Looking to continue remote working from home after Covid-19? This article will explain how to ask your boss for this favor without getting fired.

Why Should You Continue Working From Home?

There are so many reasons to work from home a gazillion of them, in fact. Although you may have drawn your own conclusions based on the current atypical experience, these are some of the basic reasons why almost anyone would want to reply to emails from their couch:

Increased productivity

Every employer definitely wants to see a productive employee in a team. But how can you increase or maintain your productivity? For a lot of people, it’s easier to stay productive when they have a perfect and relaxing work space.

Unfortunately, some modern office spaces don’t exactly give you much to work with when it comes to creating a relaxing work environment. The most you can do is throw in a potted plant and a framed photo for decor.

On the other hand, working from home gives you the perfect atmosphere for work. With just a study table, a little renovation, and the right lighting, you can create an amazing work space that would definitely boost your productivity level.

It’s cheaper

Firstly, for people who have to take two buses just to get to work, opting for remote work jobs is definitely a cheaper option. Secondly, you can also cross “lunch” off your list of daily expenses. Hungry? Grab a sandwich or make a bowl of cereal instead of buying an overpriced burger for lunch. This way, you’d get to spend less and save more.

Increased work-life balance

Here’s the moment of raw truth: do you really have a life outside of work? For a lot of people in their thirties and above, the answer to this question is a hard no. If you work by a 9-5 schedule, you’d find it a tad difficult to party or engage in any social activity outside work hours.

Any spare time you have would most likely be spent catching a break or preparing your outfit for the next day.

However, the flexibility associated with working from home lets you create the perfect work-life balance without getting fizzled out. This way, you won’t have to sacrifice your personal life on the altar of work.

Less stress

Working from home isn’t a leeway to escape work or binge on your favourite Netflix series. However, it’s considerably less stressful than going to a physical office every day.

For starters, you won’t have to spend hours choosing the perfect outfit for work. You can even spend an entire work day wearing only a pair of sweatpants. Similarly, the chances of you having to work extra unpaid hours are lower when you work remotely.

How to Ask Your Boss About Remote Work

So, you’ve figured out how to work remotely and you’re ready to walk down this exciting path. But how do you broach the topic with your boss? Just before you get started, it’s important to note that there’s a huge chance that your proposal would be turned down. However, the following tips would help to ensure that you get a positive response from your employer:

Ensure that your current performance is top-notch

Studies have shown that employers are more inclined to grant favours to top-performing workers. As such, just before you pop the question, it’s important to make sure that your performance in recent times has been top-notch. If your employer isn’t impressed with your performance when you work under their watch, it’s unlikely that working from home will yield better results.

Here are some questions that would help you determine if your performance is good enough to get you remote working hours:

  • How would you rate your past performance reviews?
  • Have you had any queries recently?
  • Has the management complained about a drop in your performance?
  • If yes, how have you been able to rectify the situation?
  • What positive feedback have you received from your employer or clients?

The answers to these questions are a clear indicator of what your employer thinks about your performance. If it is below par, then you may need to postpone the conversation until you improve.

This way, you’d be sure of getting a positive response.

Explore your reasons for wanting to work remotely

Exploring your motivation for wanting to work remotely is essential as it adds substance to your proposal. You may not need to explain the nitty-gritty of it but a solid, basic explanation should cut it.

However, just before you begin to list out your reasons, it’s important to do a little soul-searching first. Why do you really want to work from home?

Is commuting to work too stressful for you? Do you need a quiet and more productive work space? Are you trying to improve your mental health?

Drawing up a list of solid reasons will help to convince your employer. If possible, add data and facts to back up your reason. For instance, if commuting to work is too stressful, track the time it takes you to get to work, as well as the financial implications.

Once you’ve laid out your reasons with relevant data to back them up, you can then go on to explain how working from home would solve these problems.

Create a list of all benefits

Working remotely isn’t just about you. Your employer needs to know how the new arrangement would benefit the company as well. Fortunately, remote work comes with a plethora of benefits that would definitely interest your employer.

To help you plead your case, here are some interesting stats about working from home:

  • According to research, remote work greatly reduces absenteeism as remote workers take fewer sick leaves.
  • Remote workers are generally more productive and engaged.
  • Work from home helps to improve employee retention.
  • A flexible working system helps to improve the physical and mental health of employees.
  • Remote work cuts costs for businesses and companies.
  • Work from home option makes employers and companies more attractive to job seekers.

You could also carry out research for industry-specific stats about remote working. This would give your proposal more credibility and substance.

Create a solid plan

Here’s one thing you should know: your boss would definitely have a lot of questions and rebuttals. As such, it’s important to anticipate possible problems and create a blueprint for tackling them beforehand.

Covering the practicalities is the first step to creating a solid plan for your remote journey. You would need to answer the following questions:

  • What days would you work remotely?
  • How will you define working hours?
  • Where will you work? (would you be working from home, a library or a shared office space?)
  • How will you facilitate your remote working experience?

Once you’ve covered the basics, you can go on to map out a structure to overcome the typical struggles associated with remote work. Here are some areas you should cover:

  • Strategies and tools for communicating with your employer and coworkers
  • How your boss can keep track of your progress
  • The milestones and relevant KPIs to be set

A plan that covers these factors will definitely eliminate any fears your employer may have about letting you work from home.

Layout your tools

What’s a workman without his tools? Definitely an ordinary man. Sure, you may have lofty dreams of helping your employer build an empire through remote working, but how exactly do you intend to do that? What tools do you intend to use?

A huge part of remote working boils down to the tools used. You would need to choose remote-friendly web tools for communication and collaboration. Platforms like Slack and Zoom (for visual meetings) will do the trick.

Similarly, you could also use Dropbox for sharing files and documents. This way, working from home will be a breeze for both you and your employer.

Suggest a trial period

Just like we stated earlier, there’s a huge chance that your boss would not be comfortable with the idea of letting his employees work from home. If this is the case, you could go on to suggest a trial period that could last for two weeks or less. Within this period, you would work from home to determine how the new arrangement would affect your productivity.

It’s also an opportunity to identify any problems you didn’t anticipate and work them out before your boss makes a final decision.

Final Thoughts

Working from home is quite easy and exciting, especially for millennials. However, getting your boss to share your enthusiasm about it is the tricky part.

Fortunately, these tips would help you get the answer you’re looking for. In the unlikely event that they don’t, you could always try again or search for remote-friendly companies that are hiring. Good luck!

Author: James Baxter
_
James Baxter is professional ghostwriter, editor at write my essay and blogger, who loves sharing his experience and knowledge with readers. He is especially interested in marketing, blogging, and IT. James is always happy to visit different places and meet new people there.

2020: What we’ve learnt

This entry was posted in Articles, New Year, Working life and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

2020, the year the Covid-19 pandemic broke into our lives, was especially hard for most of us. It forced us to get used to a new reality in a matter of days. Some changes were already there but they got accelerated. The impact was felt in every sphere: mentally, physically, on the economy… and of course, on how we work.

Remote working

One of our guest writers remarked that 70% of UK workers will be working flexibly even after the Covid (‘Why the work from home revolution is coming’). More versatility, a better work-life balance, and, according to some studies, higher productivity are on the ‘pros’ side of this new experience.

Of course, not everything is positive. There is enough evidence to support that there is value in presential work: spontaneous, face-to-face exchange with colleagues makes collaboration easier, allows co-creation, and possibly results in a more integrated team. We still need to find a formula to combine the benefits without affecting the production of collective intelligence.

Time management

The future of smart working depends much on our individual capacity to adapt without affecting our efficiency or personal routine. According to one of our recent articles, we should ‘try to recreate the structure that comes with working onsite by limiting distractions and setting boundaries’ at home.

Recommendations for remote working efficiently and in a healthy way have filled newspaper pages, taken up our LinkedIn feed and thousands of Twitter threads. If you’re still struggling to adapt to it, here are a few tips.

Emerging jobs

The pandemic not only showed how valuable our healthcare system and professionals are. It also revealed a shortage of trained workers in this sector, especially nurses, doctors, and support workers. For those professionals and students who are still formulating their future, the Covid crisis has opened the potential for developing more meaningful and contributive careers for society.

As the distribution of goods has become increasingly important for the economy, the Logistics sector is creating jobs on a massive scale. But it is not limited to this: professionals in Education, Finance, IT, and Construction are also highly in demand.

New job search technologies

Recruitment also adapted and reshaped at a very fast rate. Companies accelerated the implementation of some emerging technologies to continue hiring despite all odds.

Video interviews have become the new norm throughout the entire hiring process. Evaluations, questionnaires, and even contracts are signed online. Paperwork became paperless.

Other tools being implemented, such as AI-powered software used by recruiters to manage their hiring process and chatbots that enable a fluid exchange between candidates and companies.

And as for job seekers, conducting a virtual job search is mandatory now. Fortunately, most candidates are already aware of search engines such as JobisJob to browse and apply in a fast and simple way.

There’s always hope

It has been a great opportunity to appreciate our own ability to adapt and to learn. We learnt how to work and live smarter, how resilient we are, and above all, we also learnt that physical distance is not a barrier to stay connected and accomplish things together.

Job Trends in times of Covid: the Emerging Labour Market

This entry was posted in Articles, Employment trends, JobisJob Data and tagged , , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

The second wave of the coronavirus and the new restrictive measures are creating confusion and uncertainties in the job market. To combat that, your job search now has to be more accurate than ever before, based on job trends and data.

So don’t miss out on the opportunities that are emerging out there.

There’s still hope

While many jobs in the catering and hospitality sectors have been destroyed, some Health and Social Services positions are booming, followed by other industries like Logistics, Construction, and Education.

The powerful Job Market Insights tool based on big data allows us to discover the hottest job trends and the positions that are growing the most despite the crisis.

We have analysed the highest variations among the most in-demand job titles in the last six months compared to the same semester of 2019.

Healthcare and social services job trends

Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash

Healthcare and Social Services

Understandably, the Healthcare and Social Services job categories encompass most of the positions on the list due to the pandemic expansion.

All the nursing staff subcategories have experienced significant growth, including:

Other relevant medical related specialties include phlebotomists (it had a spectacular 29% increase), ward managers, pharmacists, occupational therapists, and disability assessors.

Mental health occupations are also expanding, from clinical psychologists to mental health nurses.

Social services positions have globally increased, including support workers, care home managers (21% increase) and care team leaders (30%), as well as children’s home managers.

Logistics and Distribution

The restriction measures and new consumption patterns have created a higher demand for logistic services. Distribution companies are now hiring more staff. Here is the list of the most in need positions in this sector:

Construction

While the whole job sector has experienced a relevant fall in new job offers, some specialties have grown. The biggest increase was observed for the following positions:

More job trends in other sectors

Teaching assistants, cover supervisors, and Learning support assistants are growing job opportunities in Education.

If you are searching for a position in Finance, take a look at mortgage advisor jobs, as we have observed more demand for professionals there.

Security worker jobs are also growing, especially retail security officers and security guards.

Domestic assistants, cleaners, and childcare assistants, nannies and tutors are also in demand.

_
Job trends in this article reflect the variation of job offers posted in the UK between March and September 2020 compared to the same period of 2019. Data was provided by Job Market Insights, the number one big data tool for the recruitment industry. Find more on www.jobmarketinsights.com.

Virtual Job Search: 3 Tips for Job Seekers

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, CV writing, Job interviews and tagged , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

In just a few short months so much has changed in the world, let alone in the UK. Industries, schools, homes, and healthcare were thrown into disarray as the pandemic took hold and spread from country to country.

Now, finally, there is light on the horizon. Hiring freezes are easing gradually as the lockdown eases and the country navigates its way into a social-distance compliant future. For job seekers, the major changes will be in the job search and job logistics. It is less likely that a job candidate will meet with a recruiter or hiring manager in person and more likely to be a virtual job search experience. Likewise, many employers are strengthening their remote workforces and hiring on a work-from-home (WFH) and work-from-anywhere (WFA) basis.

When you are looking for your new job opportunity you might find that you are invited to interviews via Zoom or a similar video conferencing software app. To get the best from a virtual job search take a look at our tips below.

Virtual Job Search Video interview

Photo by Allie on Unsplash.

The New Virtual Job Search

There is increased competition for jobs compared to the start of the year. To stand out, make sure your CV is up to date, that your most relevant experience shines through. CVs should be easy to read, fuss-free, and each job listed should include the relevant tasks that suit the job you are applying for.

Job advertising will remain online with job sites picking up more and more new jobs over the coming weeks and months. Stay ahead of the competitors by signing up to job alerts for the roles that interest you most. That way you will have them delivered straight to your inbox.

Be ready to apply quickly for new jobs as some employers start the interview process as applications come in. Getting your application in first could see you getting in front of the hiring manager sooner than others,” says Ken Little, a career writer at Australia2Write and Write My X.

Practice Your Virtual Interview Skills

You may have been on video call during lockdown for work and fun, and would be forgiven for thinking a virtual interview would be similar. Though the technology is the same, a virtual interview will be much more formal than even the work calls you have had. When you are invited to a video interview make sure you have the all right details. You should know who you are meeting, when the interview is, and what technology is being used. Don’t assume anything, ask for details if they are not given up front.

Practising your interview skills beforehand is a must for any job process. With virtual interviews, it is more important than ever. Rope in a friend or two to play the role of interviewer and set up a mock interview video call. Mock interviews are a great way for you to build confidence and spot any nervous tics you need to manage.

Whatever the job, always dress appropriately and preferably professionally for your interview no matter where or how it takes place.

On the day of your interview, find a quiet spot in your home where you won’t be distracted or disturbed. Clear any clutter from around so there are no distractions that might catch the hiring managers eye. “Switch on your camera before you interview so you can see in advance if the space around you is clear and close the door so no pets or kids come in,” says Hugo Davy, an editor at Britstudent and Nextcoursework.

Keep An Open Mind

It goes without saying that some industries and professions have been hit harder by Covid-19. These will be slower to restart the hiring process as they try to rebuild. This means that for many people the next job move may require them to adapt or pivot in their careers or take the advice of Sheryl Sandberg and move sideways when you can’t move up. This can be daunting but can also lead to great opportunities that you maybe hadn’t considered previously.

Adapting does not have to mean changing industry or profession completely but can also mean using your skills and experience in a new way. Keep an open mind when seeking a job and be aware of all your abilities, not just those you have used in your most recent employment.

Author: Michael Dehoyos
_
Michael is a job editor at PhD Kingdom and Assignment Writing Service. He assists companies in their hiring strategy concepts, and contributes to numerous sites and publications. Also, he is a writer at Origin Writings.