Why the work from home revolution is coming

This entry was posted in Articles, Working life and tagged , , on by Andres Herrera.

We’re all aware by now that COVID-19 has sparked a surge in flexible working across the UK. This began out of necessity, as working from home was advised wherever possible, but Britain’s workers have continued to stay at home in large numbers even after lockdown.

Although there is likely to be more of a return to normal working patterns once the COVID-19 crisis has fully passed, once the genie has escaped the bottle it’s hard to put it back in fully. As a new study from Direct Line shows, HR directors are expecting that 70% of UK workers will be working flexibly in one form or another after COVID-19. Here’s why the work from home revolution is on the way.

Work from home means greater freedom

The clue is in the name: flexible working allows workers to have more flexibility and freedom in how they balance their home and work lives. Whether they choose to work from home for only a few days a week, or even the whole week, workers have the power to choose the working pattern that suits them best.

The benefits of this are clear: working parents will be able to pick their children up from school, or work from home when they’re ill, for example. On the other end of the spectrum, the ability to work flexibly can be incredibly important for those workers who may have caring responsibilities for elderly parents.

When working from home can improve work-life balance to such a significant degree, many workers will be asking why they should be made to revert back to the traditional 9-5 in the office.

Mental health benefits

Work-related mental health problems are sadly a big problem across the UK, and working from home can help to alleviate this. As well as the improved work-life balance we’ve already covered, working from home benefits mental health in other ways too. One of the biggest positive changes is less time spent traveling to and from work. The daily commute can be a punishing ordeal for many workers – a life spent leaving home in the early morning, and returning late at night, can quickly become very depressing. Workers who commute long hours during the week have little time for anything else in their lives, and the experience itself can be stressful. Spending hours each day in cramped train carriages or in traffic jams is far from ideal for a lot of people.

Working from home (with no commute to worry about) can also allow more time for exercise during the working day: in the morning, evening, or even in the afternoon to break up the day. It goes without saying, of course, that the physical and mental health benefits of regular exercise are significant.

The tip of the iceberg

These are only a few of the most obvious benefits of working from home. The liberation of workers’ lives from a rigid, all-consuming work timetable can be hugely beneficial in a number of different ways. They can spend more time with their family, or on rewarding hobbies and activities, and all of this has the potential to increase their wellbeing.

The benefits for employees are clear, and it’s easy to see why demand is increasing from their point of view. But employers are starting to see the benefits, too, and this is another reason why the work from home revolution is coming. Happy workers are productive workers, and there is evidence to suggest that working from home could actually boost productivity – and save employers a fortune in office rental costs at the same time.

Author: Eliie Hayes

Job Trends in times of Covid: the Emerging Labour Market

This entry was posted in Articles, Employment trends, JobisJob Data and tagged , , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

The second wave of the coronavirus and the new restrictive measures are creating confusion and uncertainties in the job market. To combat that, your job search now has to be more accurate than ever before, based on job trends and data.

So don’t miss out on the opportunities that are emerging out there.

There’s still hope

While many jobs in the catering and hospitality sectors have been destroyed, some Health and Social Services positions are booming, followed by other industries like Logistics, Construction, and Education.

The powerful Job Market Insights tool based on big data allows us to discover the hottest job trends and the positions that are growing the most despite the crisis.

We have analysed the highest variations among the most in-demand job titles in the last six months compared to the same semester of 2019.

Healthcare and social services job trends

Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash

Healthcare and Social Services

Understandably, the Healthcare and Social Services job categories encompass most of the positions on the list due to the pandemic expansion.

All the nursing staff subcategories have experienced significant growth, including:

Other relevant medical related specialties include phlebotomists (it had a spectacular 29% increase), ward managers, pharmacists, occupational therapists, and disability assessors.

Mental health occupations are also expanding, from clinical psychologists to mental health nurses.

Social services positions have globally increased, including support workers, care home managers (21% increase) and care team leaders (30%), as well as children’s home managers.

Logistics and Distribution

The restriction measures and new consumption patterns have created a higher demand for logistic services. Distribution companies are now hiring more staff. Here is the list of the most in need positions in this sector:

Construction

While the whole job sector has experienced a relevant fall in new job offers, some specialties have grown. The biggest increase was observed for the following positions:

More job trends in other sectors

Teaching assistants, cover supervisors, and Learning support assistants are growing job opportunities in Education.

If you are searching for a position in Finance, take a look at mortgage advisor jobs, as we have observed more demand for professionals there.

Security worker jobs are also growing, especially retail security officers and security guards.

Domestic assistants, cleaners, and childcare assistants, nannies and tutors are also in demand.

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Job trends in this article reflect the variation of job offers posted in the UK between March and September 2020 compared to the same period of 2019. Data was provided by Job Market Insights, the number one big data tool for the recruitment industry. Find more on www.jobmarketinsights.com.

3 Tips for Better Time Management Working from Home

This entry was posted in Uncategorized on by Andres Herrera.

According to statistics from LinkedIn, 82 percent of professionals would like to work from home one day a week or more, with 57 percent wanting to work from home three or more days.

COVID-19 has normalized remote work, and for many, it is more efficient. But there are some challenges that come with working remotely, not the least of which is time management.

Here are a few tips to make the most of your time when working from home:

Set Virtual Boundaries Between Work and Home

When working remotely, have a workspace away from the distractions of the rest of your home. Make sure you have everything you need to work within reach and good internet connectivity.

Try to stick to a set schedule. Allow for exceptions, of course, but try to guard against working around the clock. 

If possible, install Slack, Zoom, or whatever collaboration software your company uses, on your mobile phone. That way, even at the doctor’s office, you can respond to important messages, still be engaged, and get work done.

Turn off text messaging and personal email alerts while working remotely. They can distract you when working, and you want to make sure you stick with the schedule you set from beginning to end. Even if you only glance at these mini-interruptions or just delete spam emails as they come through, that time adds up. Before you know it, you may have wasted an hour.

When it comes to personal issues at home, spend your time and attention wisely. Focus on the big picture first, and you can worry about the details as time permits.

Of course, get your work done completely and on time.

Take Care of Your Mental Health

When you take a remote work job, you should adjust your expectations of yourself, your family, and the people you work with.

Your workday won’t look the same as it does in an office setting. Don’t necessarily expect lots of feedback, the way a boss might be able to provide onsite. If you self-evaluate, you won’t have to spend time waiting for feedback. 

Make sure you get enough sleep and eat right, and plan meal times so they don’t become another distraction.

Do larger tasks first unless you feel like you need a break to avoid burnout, in which case do small or easier tasks first or take a break before you dive into work. Do as much prep work as you can before you start a project. That way when you actually do it, things will go more efficiently. Avoid the trap of trying to multitask, and don’t procrastinate. Reach out for assistance as needed. You still have supervisors and colleagues as resources to offer guidance and advice even if you work remotely.

Learn patience, too. What seems like an emergency project may turn out to be something that can wait.

Embrace interruptions. Sometimes they’re just what you need to give yourself a mental time out.

Above all, always be mindful, relax and laugh often. Working from home doesn’t mean you can’t have fun.

Allow Yourself Flexibility

Use your own to-do lists or organizational tools that work for you in addition to whatever workflow software your company uses. Set project goals for yourself, and be prepared for the interruptions and realities of life, which will be a lot closer to you when you work remotely. 

Don’t bug your supervisors, but let them know if you’re swamped, and ask for extensions as needed.

When stressful projects are postponed or a personal emergency is settled, take the time to relish in the relief. Don’t just move on to the next thing. Internalize it and let it help you enjoy working remotely from a deep place. Time management should automatically become easier.

When you tackle a project at home, break large tasks down into small chunks (this is advice for any project).

Do each portion, and when you’ve finished a few, or feel yourself losing steam, give yourself a break.

When you’re ready to work again, move on to the next portion. Before you know it, you’ll be done.

In Closing

Working from home can be great. But you need strong time management skills. Try to recreate the structure that comes with working onsite by limiting distractions and setting boundaries. Take care of your mental health and use whatever resources you have available to make your workload manageable. 

Above all, enjoy the freedom and perks of working remotely, and consider these tips so you can manage your time successfully.

Author: Brad Wayland
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Brad is a business consultant and the Chief Strategy Officer at BlueCotton, a site with high-quality, easy-to-design custom t-shirts.

What do Recruiters Look For on a Resume at the First Glance?

This entry was posted in Articles, CV writing and tagged , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

A resume is your representative or even an ambassador while applying for jobs. Hence, it’s most important to create a superb impression that can get you that interview call and possibly the job.

Therefore, here’s a vital question: What do recruiters look for on a resume at the first glance? What are the elements that should feature on a resume and how long your resume should be to attract employers?

Understandably, these may sound complex questions. However, with some effort, you can create a wonderful resume that actually catches the attention of recruiters at the very first glance.

resume writing

Photo by Magnet.me on Unsplash

What Recruiters Look on Resume at First Glance?

There’re five major elements of your resume that recruiters look for at the first glance. I’ll explain their relevance and how you can improve your resume to make it appealing.

1. Your Career Objective

There’s a huge debate among Human Resources circles whether a career objective on a resume is relevant or not in today’s era. Personally, I believe it is very relevant and important too. That’s because a well-written career objective actually leads a recruiter tor read the resume further.

Unfortunately, most jobseekers tend to write very uninspiring or vague career objectives, which can fit almost any entity for any job. This puts off recruiters. Hence, there’re very high chances your resume might get rejected merely because your career objective is poorly written.

A career objective is your personal vision and mission statement. It should clearly outline what’re your professional and personal goals in life. Yes, personal goals too. Because a career isn’t merely about a job. A career defines your whole lifestyle for a major part of your working life.

2. Skills

It’s worth remembering that skills are totally different from work experience. You might have several years of experience at a specific job. That doesn’t necessarily imply that you possess the skills that a new job requires. Therefore, one of the things that recruiters look on your resume at first glance is your skills that would prove useful to the business, if they hire you.

Therefore, before drafting a resume, the first thing to do is read the job post or job advert thoroughly. Comprehend what skills the recruiter is looking at and the nature of their business. And leverage your skills in line with the recruiter’s needs. Obviously, you won’t have all the skills that a recruiter requires. However, you can pitch as many skills as you have and point out their relevance to the recruiter’s business.

A common mistake that most jobseekers commit is to send a general resume to every recruiter. This doesn’t really entice a recruiter to shortlist you for an interview. Therefore, customizing a resume to suit the skills set required by a recruiter works wonders.

Also, include your soft skills because they matter a lot nowadays. Recruiters also look for desirable soft skills from a resume.

3. Career Graph

If you’re a fresher, the career graph doesn’t matter because you would be applying for the first job. However, do not forget to include any internships and traineeships that you’ve done while completing a course.

Secondly, also highlight any projects that you did while being a student or intern. These could be individual or group projects. The reason: projects speak volumes about your soft skills and aptitude for any specific job.

And for job seekers with some experience, recruiters look at your career graph for an altogether different reason. They wish to learn whether you’re progressing or stagnating in your career. However, a stagnant career graph isn’t something to worry about if that’s exactly the reason you’re looking for a career change.

If your career is going upwards, the recruiter would most likely be impressed and shortlist you for an interview call. That’s because career growth indicates you’re serious about your works and life and interested in the field.

4. Gaps between Jobs

Gaps between jobs on your resume are definitely something that catches the eye of a recruiter at the first glance. Because these gaps can indicate some serious flaws in your career. It indicates you’re changing jobs frequently and these could be due to negative reasons such as addictions, termination, and undesirable behavior, inability to get along with colleagues and seniors, or overall ineptitude, among others.

If you can genuinely justify gaps in your career, it’s fine. If not, never try to patch them up by giving false dates of leaving and joining any job. A simple Employee Background Screening (EBS) check will expose the truth. This can cost your job. Worse, it can create a very poor impression about you in the overall job market and several recruiters might not even consider you for employment, despite having all skills and qualifications.

Never fudge your resume to cover up gaps on your resume. If you’re asked to explain, provide the genuine reason without justifying yourself.

5. Professional & Social Affiliations

Your professional and social affiliations on a resume matter a lot. You could be a member of a professional guild or forum, alumni, social, or even sports and cultural organization. These affiliations always have a story to tell about you which a recruiter will try and grasp at the first glance.

For example, membership of a forum of professionals shows your interest in a specific field and career. It means, you have a vast resource of talent from where you could get ideas or solutions that might help your employer too, albeit indirectly. Membership of a social or cultural organization speaks of your personality traits.

At the same time, be a bit careful if you’re adding affiliations to any political or religious organizations. The employer may see things in a different light. While you can mention these political or religious affiliations casually, never use them to leverage your application for a job. That’s in very poor taste.

In Conclusion

If you pay attention to these five elements that recruiters look on a resume at the first glance, there’re high chances you might land an interview call. Also, I would suggest you read the difference between a curriculum vitae and a resume because the two are distinct and different documents.

Author: Natasha Shetty

How to Combat the Post-Holiday Blues

This entry was posted in Articles, Working life and tagged , , , on by Aina Ferretti.

Getting back to work after the holidays is not easy. Just the idea of returning to the usual routine can create a feeling of stress, sadness, irritability, or other mood swings. These are the first symptoms of the post-vacation syndrome, commonly known as post-holiday blues.

This syndrome is not officially recognized as an illness, but studies show that one in three people may suffer from it. In addition to psychological problems such as anxiety or lack of concentration, there are also physical symptoms such as sleep disorders, muscle aches, etc. This condition has been further aggravated this year by COVID-19 and the social isolation brought about by many of the consequent changes in our working conditions.

However, there is hope! Positive thinking, a positive attitude, and positive actions are great allies. Holidays give you the opportunity to relax and recharge your batteries. Use this energy to get back to work with a new, refreshed outlook.

post-holiday blues

5 tips on how to avoid or combat post-holiday blues

 

  1. Seek new goals. New challenges are great for renovating your enthusiasm!
  2. Get organized and schedule your week. You’ll feel more in control and this will reduce stress and contribute to your self-motivation.
  3. Practice sport. Stimulating the production of endorphins will help you feel good and keep the blues at bay.
  4. Watch your diet. Eat foods with serotonin such as oily fish, bananas, and tomatoes… This will help you to stay in a good mood. Avoid alcohol, as it increases feelings of sadness, and coffee, which intensifies anxiety.
  5. Smile! Spread your smile in the work environment. This will help increase your own productivity and the productivity of others.

Remember, the key to an energised and positive return after the holidays is your attitude and your outlook on things!

We hope these tips help you beat the blues!

Do leave a comment on how you dealt with the post-holiday experience. ;)