Tag Archives: Career

Get Back on the Career Ladder after the Coronavirus

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice and tagged , , , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

The sudden onset of the coronavirus global pandemic not only badly affected the lives of people but also dramatically transformed their employment status. These dramatic changes are still in the air, and people are struggling daily on both personal and professional levels, hoping for things to go back to normal.

The Office for National Statistics shows that as many as 615,000 people lost their jobs due to the global pandemic. Although the government is providing relief to the unemployed, they are still deprived of the life they enjoyed before the pandemic.

In fact, 1 in 5 people claims that their economic condition has taken a bad hit after Covid. 68% of them say that their earnings have declined, while 8% say they have no source of income.

What is a person to do in such bleak circumstances? First of all, don’t lose hope! Like all things, this too shall pass. Secondly, read on to learn doable tips to get back on the career ladder:

1. Make an Impressive Resume

Your resume must be good enough to stand out among others in the market. Why? Because after Covid-19, now you are not the only one who is struggling to get a job again. For a single vacant position, there are hundreds of applicants. Hence, organizations only chose the best candidate. A standout resume helps you get picked.

Restructure your resume; Build a master CV. A master CV shows all your educational backgrounds and your previous work experiences. Moreover, make sure that you proofread it twice before applying for any job. Your CV should be free of any grammatical and spelling errors.

If you are not an expert in making a good CV, you can always take the help of a CV expert. Because remember, the first impression is the last impression, and your first impression is the CV that you would send to the employers.

2. Be Active on LinkedIn

Although LinkedIn is not an exciting social media platform like Facebook or Instagram, this is the place where you have to be more active to find employment opportunities.  It is an employment-oriented platform that connects employers with employees.

This is where the organizations and businesses post their open job vacancies and reach potential candidates. This time, it is more important to make your LinkedIn account up to date and it should look professional.  Expand your connections. With expanding connections, the American-based platform helps you find out about the job openings and know about the employers in advance.

3. Be Active on Social Media

During the lockdown of the global pandemic, most businesses have transformed their major activities on social media platforms.  There are chances that you might end up meeting with your future boss through any of the social media platforms.

Most fashion and FMCG brands use social media accounts not only to reach their target clients but also the talented employers they are looking for.

4. Work On Your Skills

While in lockdown and limited to your homes, you have plenty of time to invest in your skills.  With polished skills, there are high chances that you will get a good job soon. If not, at least, it opens multiple doors of opportunities and lets you excel in your career.

A Skills Toolkit with free online courses to help improve digital and numeracy skills has been launched by the government. You should give it a try.  There are many online courses that you can choose to up your skills in your field.

5. Put in Effort Every Day

Being unemployed is also a full-time job because you have to look for a job every day.  You have to visit the job website every single day, to stay updated.  Prepare your CV and cover letter to instantly apply whenever a job clicks you.

Each day, try to apply for as many jobs as you can. This increases the chances of being called for an interview and getting hired.  Even if you do not receive a response according to your expectations, do not lose hope.  There is a time for everything, and your time will come soon.

6. Be Flexible

If you have lost your job in the pandemic, you cannot afford to be rigid. It is the time to think if you have any skills that can let you apply in different industries, and if you can shift your career into any other growing industry – at least for the time till you get your desired job in your field.

Remember there are many skills that can be easily transformed from one industry to another. Just focus on how you would represent these in your resume so that the employer picks you up.

7. Look For a More Secure Job

This is a time of crisis all across the globe. Many businesses and organizations are badly impacted by the virus. Many people working in the industries of hospitality, fun, and entertainment have lost jobs.

Even the freelancers faced a great decline in work.  Make sure that the next time, you apply for a job in a relatively stable industry.

For example, hospitality is a big no at the moment, but the digital marketing and software development sector is booming.  Therefore, they are a safe bet in the current situation.

Final Thoughts: Jobs After the Coronavirus Crisis

Covid-19 has been tough for all of us; businesses and people across the world are badly impacted.  Many small businesses are permanently or temporarily closed down, while most of the people lost their jobs.

If you have also lost your job, and are running out of options, do not panic. Finding a new job is not easy, but try the above tips to help you land a good job, even during the pandemic.

Author: Arslan Hassan
_
Arslan Hassan is an electrical engineer with a passion for writing, designing, and anything tech-related. His educational background in the technical field has given him the edge to write on many topics. He occasionally writes blog articles for Dynamologic Solutions

What factors contribute to an ideal workplace?

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, Working life and tagged , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

Although a job is a job, numerous mitigating factors will influence your decision when applying and interviewing for a job. The workplace, quality of working life and the management team will help shape your decision, in addition to the location, role and payment agreement. Your skillset, skill level and previous experience are all primary factors that will help put you in the running when pursuing competitive job positions at reputable workplaces. We take you through some of the factors which you should take into consideration when seeking a job, writes Keith Tully of Real Business Rescue, a company restructuring and turnaround specialist.

Competitive pay package

Although the work environment may be inviting and up to a high standard, the novelty is likely to wear off if the job is poorly paid. If an employer is serious about employee satisfaction, they should make the financial commitment to pay staff for their efforts without compromising on incentive schemes, bonuses and employee entertainment. In addition to boosting employee satisfaction, this is likely to have a direct impact on retention rates. If a staff member is poorly paid, the costs of recruitment and the volume of missed work could simply contribute to a higher pay package.

A competitive pay package can elevate your standard of living and should typically match your position in life. For example, if you are the primary worker in your household, you should be able to afford essential expenses, such as household bills, loans, childcare fees, and maintenance costs. If your income is not enough to compensate for essential outgoings, it may be necessary for you to switch to a workplace with better regard for employee wages.

Regard for personal life

Entering the workplace or working from home can become an arduous routine if professionalism is used as a cover to seal away talks of personal life. As employees spend most of their working week with each other, it is essential to discover similarities between one another, share milestones and relate to similar experiences. By delving into your personal life, you can paint an accurate image of your personality, interests, and family life.

Stepping into your office or logging into your work portal should not require putting on a façade when experiencing major life moments, both fortunate and unfortunate. Encouraging conversation and shining a light into your personal life can help strengthen the bond between colleagues and add value to the workplace. If family affairs and commitments require your attention during working hours, easy access to work-life flexibility not only shows regard for your personal life but also humanises your employer.

Growth potential

The natural journey of personal growth extends to all your life experiences, from personal milestones to your roles and responsibilities in the workplace. If your workplace has no structured growth plan in place with established targets, your passion for the job may wilt away, leading to boredom to set in. If you feel as though you are in a dead-end job with no growth potential in sight, this could be at the detriment of your personal development.

Part of working life involves building upon your skillset, education and understanding of the industry to elevate your performance standards and portfolio. If your workplace is open to providing you with access to further training, qualifications, and educational courses, this shows a clear commitment to invest in the growth of employees. By offering professional development to help employees climb through the ranks of the company, you can work towards earning a promotion.

Regular appraisal

An appraisal is a regular review of an individual’s performance based on key indicators. To successfully conduct an appraisal, your line manager or employer will need to closely assess your work and behaviour over a set period. By identifying both positive and negative notes, the employer can work hand in hand with you to establish a set of personalised targets. Any concerns and worries are usually addressed during an appraisal under strict confidentiality.

Job description

The location of your workplace, distance and travel time may shape the way you handpick job opportunities as this will influence your standard of working life. Your ideal workplace may be situated close to your home to minimise commute time. An ideal workplace should justify the time spent travelling to the location and maybe even offer flexibility around working hours if this is important to you.

The ideal workplace

The components which make up an ideal workplace will ultimately be personal to you and depend on your employment terms. From employee recognition through to one-to-one managerial support, your experience will be influenced by numerous factors. The sector you work in and the business’s financial health will determine the scope of the financial incentives, resources, and support on offer.

Author: Dennis Taylor

2020: What we’ve learnt

This entry was posted in Articles, New Year, Working life and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

2020, the year the Covid-19 pandemic broke into our lives, was especially hard for most of us. It forced us to get used to a new reality in a matter of days. Some changes were already there but they got accelerated. The impact was felt in every sphere: mentally, physically, on the economy… and of course, on how we work.

Remote working

One of our guest writers remarked that 70% of UK workers will be working flexibly even after the Covid (‘Why the work from home revolution is coming’). More versatility, a better work-life balance, and, according to some studies, higher productivity are on the ‘pros’ side of this new experience.

Of course, not everything is positive. There is enough evidence to support that there is value in presential work: spontaneous, face-to-face exchange with colleagues makes collaboration easier, allows co-creation, and possibly results in a more integrated team. We still need to find a formula to combine the benefits without affecting the production of collective intelligence.

Time management

The future of smart working depends much on our individual capacity to adapt without affecting our efficiency or personal routine. According to one of our recent articles, we should ‘try to recreate the structure that comes with working onsite by limiting distractions and setting boundaries’ at home.

Recommendations for remote working efficiently and in a healthy way have filled newspaper pages, taken up our LinkedIn feed and thousands of Twitter threads. If you’re still struggling to adapt to it, here are a few tips.

Emerging jobs

The pandemic not only showed how valuable our healthcare system and professionals are. It also revealed a shortage of trained workers in this sector, especially nurses, doctors, and support workers. For those professionals and students who are still formulating their future, the Covid crisis has opened the potential for developing more meaningful and contributive careers for society.

As the distribution of goods has become increasingly important for the economy, the Logistics sector is creating jobs on a massive scale. But it is not limited to this: professionals in Education, Finance, IT, and Construction are also highly in demand.

New job search technologies

Recruitment also adapted and reshaped at a very fast rate. Companies accelerated the implementation of some emerging technologies to continue hiring despite all odds.

Video interviews have become the new norm throughout the entire hiring process. Evaluations, questionnaires, and even contracts are signed online. Paperwork became paperless.

Other tools being implemented, such as AI-powered software used by recruiters to manage their hiring process and chatbots that enable a fluid exchange between candidates and companies.

And as for job seekers, conducting a virtual job search is mandatory now. Fortunately, most candidates are already aware of search engines such as JobisJob to browse and apply in a fast and simple way.

There’s always hope

It has been a great opportunity to appreciate our own ability to adapt and to learn. We learnt how to work and live smarter, how resilient we are, and above all, we also learnt that physical distance is not a barrier to stay connected and accomplish things together.

Guide to careers in translation: you’ll need more than just language skills!

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice and tagged , , on by Andres Herrera.

A successful translation career starts with language skills, but it certainly doesn’t end there. In fact, professional translation, whether you work freelance or for a translation company, requires a whole host of abilities as well as the actual translator skills. In this post, we’ll take a look at the translator skills you need and why they are important.

Career in translation

Photo by Nick Fewings on Unsplash.

Let’s start with the basics. What is a translation service? A translation service converts one language to another. The translation can be of a document, an audio file, a video file, or a spoken language event such as a presentation or webinar (i.e. interpretation services). Clearly, language skills play a key role in this. Without being able to speak two languages fluently, you won’t fare well as a translator.

However, there is a whole array of other skills that you need in order to translate well. The Open University’s course on Translation as a Career highlights this starkly when it lists the competencies required to make a good translator. Of the 15 skills listed, ‘excellent knowledge of the foreign language’ only places 12th on the list.

What skills do you need to translate professionally?

If you’re asking yourself, “What qualifications do I need to be a translator?” then it’s important to look beyond language. A formal qualification such as a language degree is an excellent and often essential starting point, but then it’s time to focus on soft skills.

How are your organisation skills? What about your attention to detail? Both of these will stand you in good stead if you want to translate professionally. You will need to be organised in your handling of individual translation jobs, as well as your approach to managing everything from clients to invoicing.

Attention to detail, of course, is a must when you work with language. A single mistranslated word can change the meaning of a sentence or, indeed, render it meaningless. And when it comes to medical translation, legal translation, and the like, a mistranslation can have significant consequences.

Excellent IT skills are also a must. Translation technology has a lot to offer when it comes to helping to translate more efficiently and accurately. Those who can quickly embrace the latest software will have a distinct advantage.

On a more traditional level, translators also need good, old-fashioned writing abilities! Writing for a living, whether it’s your own copy or the translation of someone else’s document, requires not just perfect spelling and grammar but also an instinctive feel for the flow of the languages that you’re working with.

Marketing your translation service

Networking skills are essential if you want to succeed in providing translation services for a living. You’ll need to find a steady stream of clients and then impress them with more than just language skills. Being personable and professional will help you to make the right connections and then develop them into relationships.

This need to network well applies no matter how you plan to market your translation service and obtain clients. Whether you’re going for work with a translation agency, through a freelancing site like Upwork, or by connecting with clients directly, you need to be able to build bridges and make them last.

Part of maintaining a client base is being flexible and adaptable. There are times when a client will realise far too late in the day that they need a translation urgently or will change their mind halfway through the translation job about some important detail that will impact the way the work needs to progress. In these cases, it is the translator who can flex their services and timescales who will end up retaining the client’s business over the longer term.

Sector-specific translation experience

Successful translators often bring a great deal of subject knowledge to the table as well. This allows them to specialise when they translate. That can involve offering anything from marketing translation to video translation – and anything and everything in between!

This specialist knowledge can help clients to laser-focus their translations in order to obtain the best possible results. Translators with plentiful experience of a particular sector can work faster and, arguably, more accurately than those who lack such specialist knowledge. This passes obvious benefits to the client.

Cultural awareness also comes into play here. Translators at the top of their game can gently mould the text that they work with to ensure that it perfectly meets the cultural expectations of the intended audience. It’s a skill that develops natively over time and is an essential part of successful professional translation.

Routes into translation as a career

Once you’ve got a language qualification under your belt, there are various routes into professional translation. You can apply directly for a job with a company that needs translation work completed regularly and so is hiring in-house. You can also apply to one or more translation agencies, in which case the agency will take care of the finding clients and billing elements of the work, leaving you free to focus purely on the translation.

Online job sites (Upwork, Fiverr, and the like) mean that you can also set out to find your own clients, albeit with a percentage of your income paid to the relevant site. You can also recruit clients directly through your professional network and word of mouth. If you plan to take this approach, a strong web presence will certainly be a help.

If you’re looking to stand out from the crowd when it comes to translation work, think about the additional skills that you can offer. From localisation to desktop publishing, there are skills that clients will be looking for over and above linguistic talent. If you can provide them, you’re already a step ahead of the competition.

Of course, we should end by pointing out that skill with language is and always will be a key factor in translating for a living. What languages are in high demand for translators? These will vary depending on where you are based. However, Ethnologue notes that English is the world’s largest language in terms of native and non-native speaker numbers, while Mandarin Chinese is the largest based on the number of native speakers. As such, if you’re wondering, “What is the best language to learn for translation?” these make a good starting point for your consideration!

Author: Paul Fernandez

It’s Never Too Late To Change Your Career

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, Working life and tagged , , , on by Andres Herrera.

The average working person is likely to change careers between five and seven times during their life, according to career change statistics. There are many reasons why a person’s career goals shift to a different perspective but, regardless of the reason, it can be a daunting prospect, particularly in later life.

What was previously set in stone that we stay in the same job for 40 or more years has changed considerably in the modern world so that, currently, revamping yourself and career is becoming the norm. The question is how to go about it to keep a work-life balance that brings both happiness and financial security to a newfound career change.

Focus on the positives

If you’re over 50, you’re in a prime position to transfer your skills to a new career move: with plenty of knowledge and working experience, there’s no need to shy away from jumping into a new profession.

post-it-3847390_1920

Instead of focusing on the negatives such as your age, competition from younger workers, or financial issues, capitalise on the positive attributes you have. If you’re not the retiring type, working in later life will keep your mind sharper, your body fitter, and give you healthier financial independence for when you do decide to stop working. Now you have the maturity, long term commitment, and stability on your side that younger candidates won’t have.

Take your time to research

On the surface, it can be a drastic decision to make a career change later in life but providing you do your research and avoid making quick decisions, there’s nothing to stop you from making a successful transition. Whether you choose to launch your own business or sidestep to another company with better prospects, it’s essential to prepare yourself as much as possible.

Over the years, you have probably developed numerous marketable skills so determine which ones are best suited to the new position you want to apply for. It’s also a good idea to update your CV and if necessary, get professional help to hone in on all your positive attributes.

Build up a network

With years of experience on your side, the chances are that you’ve built up a considerable amount of contacts associated with your working sector and now is the time to use them.

Reach out to anyone who you think will be able to help you further your career in a different direction, from junior to senior positions so you can make significant connections in your new career choice. There are many ways to establish a path into a new work move so it would also be advisable to join professional networks and groups to become even more in tune with people and any organisational aspects of your potential career to make things easier.

… and change your career

If you concentrate on what you really want to do, possibly for the rest of your life, you’ll eventually conclude that it’s never too late to make the change, so you should just go for it!

Author: Cassandra McNulty