Tag Archives: Job Search

2020: What we’ve learnt

This entry was posted in Articles, New Year, Working life and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

2020, the year the Covid-19 pandemic broke into our lives, was especially hard for most of us. It forced us to get used to a new reality in a matter of days. Some changes were already there but they got accelerated. The impact was felt in every sphere: mentally, physically, on the economy… and of course, on how we work.

Remote working

One of our guest writers remarked that 70% of UK workers will be working flexibly even after the Covid (‘Why the work from home revolution is coming’). More versatility, a better work-life balance, and, according to some studies, higher productivity are on the ‘pros’ side of this new experience.

Of course, not everything is positive. There is enough evidence to support that there is value in presential work: spontaneous, face-to-face exchange with colleagues makes collaboration easier, allows co-creation, and possibly results in a more integrated team. We still need to find a formula to combine the benefits without affecting the production of collective intelligence.

Time management

The future of smart working depends much on our individual capacity to adapt without affecting our efficiency or personal routine. According to one of our recent articles, we should ‘try to recreate the structure that comes with working onsite by limiting distractions and setting boundaries’ at home.

Recommendations for remote working efficiently and in a healthy way have filled newspaper pages, taken up our LinkedIn feed and thousands of Twitter threads. If you’re still struggling to adapt to it, here are a few tips.

Emerging jobs

The pandemic not only showed how valuable our healthcare system and professionals are. It also revealed a shortage of trained workers in this sector, especially nurses, doctors, and support workers. For those professionals and students who are still formulating their future, the Covid crisis has opened the potential for developing more meaningful and contributive careers for society.

As the distribution of goods has become increasingly important for the economy, the Logistics sector is creating jobs on a massive scale. But it is not limited to this: professionals in Education, Finance, IT, and Construction are also highly in demand.

New job search technologies

Recruitment also adapted and reshaped at a very fast rate. Companies accelerated the implementation of some emerging technologies to continue hiring despite all odds.

Video interviews have become the new norm throughout the entire hiring process. Evaluations, questionnaires, and even contracts are signed online. Paperwork became paperless.

Other tools being implemented, such as AI-powered software used by recruiters to manage their hiring process and chatbots that enable a fluid exchange between candidates and companies.

And as for job seekers, conducting a virtual job search is mandatory now. Fortunately, most candidates are already aware of search engines such as JobisJob to browse and apply in a fast and simple way.

There’s always hope

It has been a great opportunity to appreciate our own ability to adapt and to learn. We learnt how to work and live smarter, how resilient we are, and above all, we also learnt that physical distance is not a barrier to stay connected and accomplish things together.

What do Recruiters Look For on a Resume at the First Glance?

This entry was posted in Articles, CV writing and tagged , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

A resume is your representative or even an ambassador while applying for jobs. Hence, it’s most important to create a superb impression that can get you that interview call and possibly the job.

Therefore, here’s a vital question: What do recruiters look for on a resume at the first glance? What are the elements that should feature on a resume and how long your resume should be to attract employers?

Understandably, these may sound complex questions. However, with some effort, you can create a wonderful resume that actually catches the attention of recruiters at the very first glance.

resume writing

Photo by Magnet.me on Unsplash

What Recruiters Look on Resume at First Glance?

There’re five major elements of your resume that recruiters look for at the first glance. I’ll explain their relevance and how you can improve your resume to make it appealing.

1. Your Career Objective

There’s a huge debate among Human Resources circles whether a career objective on a resume is relevant or not in today’s era. Personally, I believe it is very relevant and important too. That’s because a well-written career objective actually leads a recruiter tor read the resume further.

Unfortunately, most jobseekers tend to write very uninspiring or vague career objectives, which can fit almost any entity for any job. This puts off recruiters. Hence, there’re very high chances your resume might get rejected merely because your career objective is poorly written.

A career objective is your personal vision and mission statement. It should clearly outline what’re your professional and personal goals in life. Yes, personal goals too. Because a career isn’t merely about a job. A career defines your whole lifestyle for a major part of your working life.

2. Skills

It’s worth remembering that skills are totally different from work experience. You might have several years of experience at a specific job. That doesn’t necessarily imply that you possess the skills that a new job requires. Therefore, one of the things that recruiters look on your resume at first glance is your skills that would prove useful to the business, if they hire you.

Therefore, before drafting a resume, the first thing to do is read the job post or job advert thoroughly. Comprehend what skills the recruiter is looking at and the nature of their business. And leverage your skills in line with the recruiter’s needs. Obviously, you won’t have all the skills that a recruiter requires. However, you can pitch as many skills as you have and point out their relevance to the recruiter’s business.

A common mistake that most jobseekers commit is to send a general resume to every recruiter. This doesn’t really entice a recruiter to shortlist you for an interview. Therefore, customizing a resume to suit the skills set required by a recruiter works wonders.

Also, include your soft skills because they matter a lot nowadays. Recruiters also look for desirable soft skills from a resume.

3. Career Graph

If you’re a fresher, the career graph doesn’t matter because you would be applying for the first job. However, do not forget to include any internships and traineeships that you’ve done while completing a course.

Secondly, also highlight any projects that you did while being a student or intern. These could be individual or group projects. The reason: projects speak volumes about your soft skills and aptitude for any specific job.

And for job seekers with some experience, recruiters look at your career graph for an altogether different reason. They wish to learn whether you’re progressing or stagnating in your career. However, a stagnant career graph isn’t something to worry about if that’s exactly the reason you’re looking for a career change.

If your career is going upwards, the recruiter would most likely be impressed and shortlist you for an interview call. That’s because career growth indicates you’re serious about your works and life and interested in the field.

4. Gaps between Jobs

Gaps between jobs on your resume are definitely something that catches the eye of a recruiter at the first glance. Because these gaps can indicate some serious flaws in your career. It indicates you’re changing jobs frequently and these could be due to negative reasons such as addictions, termination, and undesirable behavior, inability to get along with colleagues and seniors, or overall ineptitude, among others.

If you can genuinely justify gaps in your career, it’s fine. If not, never try to patch them up by giving false dates of leaving and joining any job. A simple Employee Background Screening (EBS) check will expose the truth. This can cost your job. Worse, it can create a very poor impression about you in the overall job market and several recruiters might not even consider you for employment, despite having all skills and qualifications.

Never fudge your resume to cover up gaps on your resume. If you’re asked to explain, provide the genuine reason without justifying yourself.

5. Professional & Social Affiliations

Your professional and social affiliations on a resume matter a lot. You could be a member of a professional guild or forum, alumni, social, or even sports and cultural organization. These affiliations always have a story to tell about you which a recruiter will try and grasp at the first glance.

For example, membership of a forum of professionals shows your interest in a specific field and career. It means, you have a vast resource of talent from where you could get ideas or solutions that might help your employer too, albeit indirectly. Membership of a social or cultural organization speaks of your personality traits.

At the same time, be a bit careful if you’re adding affiliations to any political or religious organizations. The employer may see things in a different light. While you can mention these political or religious affiliations casually, never use them to leverage your application for a job. That’s in very poor taste.

In Conclusion

If you pay attention to these five elements that recruiters look on a resume at the first glance, there’re high chances you might land an interview call. Also, I would suggest you read the difference between a curriculum vitae and a resume because the two are distinct and different documents.

Author: Natasha Shetty

Virtual Job Search: 3 Tips for Job Seekers

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, CV writing, Job interviews and tagged , , , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

In just a few short months so much has changed in the world, let alone in the UK. Industries, schools, homes, and healthcare were thrown into disarray as the pandemic took hold and spread from country to country.

Now, finally, there is light on the horizon. Hiring freezes are easing gradually as the lockdown eases and the country navigates its way into a social-distance compliant future. For job seekers, the major changes will be in the job search and job logistics. It is less likely that a job candidate will meet with a recruiter or hiring manager in person and more likely to be a virtual job search experience. Likewise, many employers are strengthening their remote workforces and hiring on a work-from-home (WFH) and work-from-anywhere (WFA) basis.

When you are looking for your new job opportunity you might find that you are invited to interviews via Zoom or a similar video conferencing software app. To get the best from a virtual job search take a look at our tips below.

Virtual Job Search Video interview

Photo by Allie on Unsplash.

The New Virtual Job Search

There is increased competition for jobs compared to the start of the year. To stand out, make sure your CV is up to date, that your most relevant experience shines through. CVs should be easy to read, fuss-free, and each job listed should include the relevant tasks that suit the job you are applying for.

Job advertising will remain online with job sites picking up more and more new jobs over the coming weeks and months. Stay ahead of the competitors by signing up to job alerts for the roles that interest you most. That way you will have them delivered straight to your inbox.

Be ready to apply quickly for new jobs as some employers start the interview process as applications come in. Getting your application in first could see you getting in front of the hiring manager sooner than others,” says Ken Little, a career writer at Australia2Write and Write My X.

Practice Your Virtual Interview Skills

You may have been on video call during lockdown for work and fun, and would be forgiven for thinking a virtual interview would be similar. Though the technology is the same, a virtual interview will be much more formal than even the work calls you have had. When you are invited to a video interview make sure you have the all right details. You should know who you are meeting, when the interview is, and what technology is being used. Don’t assume anything, ask for details if they are not given up front.

Practising your interview skills beforehand is a must for any job process. With virtual interviews, it is more important than ever. Rope in a friend or two to play the role of interviewer and set up a mock interview video call. Mock interviews are a great way for you to build confidence and spot any nervous tics you need to manage.

Whatever the job, always dress appropriately and preferably professionally for your interview no matter where or how it takes place.

On the day of your interview, find a quiet spot in your home where you won’t be distracted or disturbed. Clear any clutter from around so there are no distractions that might catch the hiring managers eye. “Switch on your camera before you interview so you can see in advance if the space around you is clear and close the door so no pets or kids come in,” says Hugo Davy, an editor at Britstudent and Nextcoursework.

Keep An Open Mind

It goes without saying that some industries and professions have been hit harder by Covid-19. These will be slower to restart the hiring process as they try to rebuild. This means that for many people the next job move may require them to adapt or pivot in their careers or take the advice of Sheryl Sandberg and move sideways when you can’t move up. This can be daunting but can also lead to great opportunities that you maybe hadn’t considered previously.

Adapting does not have to mean changing industry or profession completely but can also mean using your skills and experience in a new way. Keep an open mind when seeking a job and be aware of all your abilities, not just those you have used in your most recent employment.

Author: Michael Dehoyos
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Michael is a job editor at PhD Kingdom and Assignment Writing Service. He assists companies in their hiring strategy concepts, and contributes to numerous sites and publications. Also, he is a writer at Origin Writings.

How to Talk About Your Weaknesses in a Job Interview

This entry was posted in Articles, Careers advice, Job interviews and tagged , , , , on by Andres Herrera.

Interviews are known for being quite stressful. Interviewers strive to learn about the candidate as much as they possibly can. They often ask tricky questions to see how prepared and stress-resistant the candidate is. In a variety of sensitive questions, several do hit hard. One of them is a question about your weaknesses.

We are supposed to show our best skills and qualities during the interview. If you are being honest about being bad at teamwork, you will hardly land the job. Yet, lying or ‘elaborating’ the truth is also not recommended. What should you do then?

The best advice is to prepare your answer. You should know how you can answer without burying yourself in lies. How? It is far less difficult than it seems. Read ahead to find out about several ways to use the weaknesses interview question to your advantage.

Weaknesses in job interview

Photo by Amy Hirschi on Unsplash.

First of All, Know Your Weaknesses

As a part of your preparation, think about your weaknesses. There must be something you and your colleagues find upsetting about you. Take a personality quiz if you cannot come up with any.

There are no ideal people, so you will definitely stumble across something. However, nothing is totally black or white. You can critically evaluate your weaknesses and come up with something that can help use them to your advantage.

For example, if you cannot find your work-life balance, say that you are getting too involved with every project and you cannot stop thinking about work even during your free time. Or, if you fail at working under no supervision, you can say that you are an excellent executor who sticks to the plan under any circumstance.

Watch What You Are Saying

Your answer should be neutral. What we mean is that if your position requires high attention to detail, you cannot say that paying too much attention to detail is your weakness. Instead, you can say that you may need extra time to double-check things before you are okay with the work done.

Do not destroy your chances of getting the job. You are in control of the situation. So, give a truthful answer but sugarcoat it.

Talk Positive

Even if you cannot switch your weakness to be actually your strength, there is still a hint on how to get away with the situation. You should be able to show it in a positive light.

For example, since school, you have been afraid to speak publicly. Even if you still feel uncertain about it, you should state what you do to address the weakness and improve yourself. You might have gone to some classes or practiced your speeches at home before going public.

Or, you can admit that you used to have poor writing skills. Say that it was a total disaster for you to work on your essays at school. Yet, you addressed this site and studied based on provided samples to deal with this weakness. Even though writing still makes you a bit unconfident, you now know that you can communicate whatever you are about to say.

Try to make your counterpart smile. Self-development deserves admiration.

Do Not Learn Prepared Answers by Heart

You want to be prepared for every interview question. It is good and appreciated. However, do not try to memorize your answer about weaknesses. You should be flexible in your response. If an interviewer sees that you are talking pre-studied text, you do nothing but harm.

Think of several scenarios to answer the weaknesses question. Critically analyze the situation and answer it in a way you think best. This is the time when it is more about strategy rather than tactics.

Mention Work-Related Weaknesses

One of the most common interview weaknesses is to go personal. Your own dramas usually have nothing to do with your work. Everyone has them, but they hardly have an impact on your quality as a professional.

Interviewers will consider personal answers inappropriate for the business world. In other words, it will be a huge minus to your application. HRs and interviewers look for something that would make them feel that you can handle whatever it is that distracts or keeps you from work. They want to hear that despite all of it, you make things done.

Final Words

Every job interview requires preparation. The question about weaknesses is one of the trickiest ones. You should know how to answer it in a way that actually makes you a better worker. Yet, do not cross the line where you tell lies. Interviewers have enough experience to distinguish truth from dishonesty. Pre-studied texts also do no good.

You should have several weaknesses you are ready to talk about. Be flexible with your answer and tailor it to the conversation you’ve had before. It largely helps in securing a place.

Author: Sandra Larson
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Sandra is a freelance academic writer who specializes in resume writing. She knows the slightest details of the job application process and helps applicants with their interviews. In this article, Sandra shares some advice on how to answer the question about weaknesses to ace the interview.

Job Interview Technique: Asking & Answering Questions

This entry was posted in Careers advice, Job interviews and tagged , , , on by Andres Herrera.

If you have attended several job interviews, you may have realized there is a set of questions employers usually ask. Some of them may seem unfitting but all have a specific purpose. This is why you should know what employers want to know with these most asked interview questions and a helpful job interview technique.

What Is the True Meaning of the Most Asked Job Interview Questions?

 

  • “What can you tell us about yourself?”

You may consider it’s inappropriate because it seems way too general. You can’t cover all the aspects of your life. And it’s impossible to guess what the recruiter wants to find about your person. So, what is the true meaning of this question? Employers test your ability to interact with others. Your answer will give an idea of how you present yourself in a social setting and about the personal traits that you consider important.

  • “What is your biggest flaw?”

Nobody is prone to give an honest answer to this question. Why would you talk openly about your flaws with the person on whom your future job depends? The recruiter wants to find out if you are honest and if you are capable of overcoming your flaw. If you say that you work too much, it’s not considered a real obstacle. When giving an authentic example, for instance, if you aren’t good at multitasking, you should say what you did to manage the problem with multitasking.

  • “Where do you see yourself in 5 years?”

The question might seem inappropriate because no one can predict their future. It might force most candidates to give an answer related to the company in question because they feel they have to be loyal to it. But, in reality, this is your opportunity to talk about your long term goals. It gives the employer an idea of your professional plans and how you intend to progress. It’s also an opportunity to talk about your strengths and to highlight the areas where you think you’ll grow the most.

  • “Why do you want to work for our company?”

Most candidates consider that as long as you fit the job description and you go to the interview, the reasons for applying are unnecessary. But the hirer wants to measure your interest in that job. If you’re only interested in the paycheck, the company might want a candidate that’s more enthusiastic about the opportunity. The question is a way to eliminate those who apply for inappropriate reasons.

  • “Why do you want to leave your current job?”

It seems like an obvious question. You want to leave because the job is unsatisfying. But the employer wants to ensure that the reasons for making you leave your current company won’t repeat. If you say that it’s because of your boss, the recruiter might think you’re a difficult employee. It’s best to focus on how the job is not fulfilling your professional goal. Explain how the wanted job will help you grow.

Good job interview techniques are required when preparing for that important meeting. Besides the actual preparation, consulting good interview techniques might let you discover some helping details.

A Good Job Interview Technique: Asking the Right Questions

 

One good interview technique is to interview the interviewer. Of course, I mean choosing the right questions to ask the recruiter during the interview. This way you will get a full image of the company and the position. This good interview technique helps you to express how interested you are in the company and the job. It also shows if the job is suitable for you.

  • “What would be my daily responsibilities?”

Before getting a job it’s important to know what the exact duties will be. It’s possible that you’ve created an image that doesn’t correspond to reality. This is the time to clear any possible concerns. Pay attention to what the interviewer says. If they can’t give you precise information, think twice before choosing the job. Try asking further questions.

  • “What opportunities for improvement and advancement do I have?”

This question will serve you in at least two ways. Firstly, you will discover how could you advance in your career, and secondly, you will find out what skills the advancement will require. It also will show the interviewer that you are an ambitious person with perspectives for the future.

  • “What is the biggest challenge the company is facing in the present?”

Through this question, you will find out more about the company while demonstrating that you are interested in doing more than routine work. The recruiter will appreciate the question, especially if it’s well documented. In other words, if you informed in advance about the company’s objectives and problems.

  • “When did you start working for this company?”

Most people enjoy talking about themselves. In addition to this, you have the opportunity to learn more about your potential boss and the hiring company.

  • “What criteria should meet the person taking the job?”

Even though the requirements were listed in the job announcement, it wouldn’t hurt to hear them again. The recruiter might give some extra information and you will see if you fit the description.

Everyone knows how difficult it is to save face while being interviewed because everything depends only on you. In this case, you have to prepare questions to answer and ask. It can help you be yourself and behave more freely.

Author: Diane H. Wong
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Diane is a business coach with more than 5 years of experience. She likes producing articles for research paper writing help. She has her own pages on some websites where she shares her knowledge with others.